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Artikel

12 Dez 2016

Autor:
Steve Coll, New Yorker (USA)

USA: CEO of ExxonMobil likely nominee for Secretary of State - has history of being a "partner to dictators", says New Yorker magazine

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Rex Tillerson, From a Corporate Oil Sovereign to the State Department, 11 Dec 2016

The news that President-elect Donald Trump is expected to nominate Rex Tillerson, the chairman and chief executive of ExxonMobil, as his Secretary of State is astonishing on many levels. As an exercise of public diplomacy, it will certainly confirm the assumption of many people around the world that American power is best understood as a raw, neocolonial exercise in securing resources.  Tillerson figures prominently in “Private Empire: ExxonMobil and American Power,” a book I wrote about the corporation that came out in 2012. He declined my requests to interview him for that project... 

Because oil projects require huge amounts of capital and only pay off fully over decades, Tillerson has favored doing business in countries that offer political stability, even if this stability was achieved through authoritarian rule...

Although ExxonMobil has a stated policy of promoting human rights, and has incorporated the advice of human-rights activists in its corporate-security policies, it nonetheless works as a partner to dictators... It does not interfere in the politics of host countries. The right kinds of dictators can be more predictable and profitable than democracies. ExxonMobil has had more luck making money in Equatorial Guinea, a small, oil-rich West African dictatorship that has been ruled for decades by a single family, than in Alaska, where raucous electoral politics has made it hard for Exxon to nail down stable deal terms... 

ExxonMobil promotes the rule of law around the world—especially that part of the rule of law that favors international investment and makes international contracts enforceable.

Part of the following timelines

Election of Donald Trump as President of the USA - implications for business & human rights

USA: Human rights & environmental NGOs raise concerns over nomination of ExxonMobil CEO as Secretary of State