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24 Feb 2012

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Democracy Now

[video] Supreme Court to Decide Whether US Corporations Can Be Sued for Abuses They Support Overseas

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The U.S. Supreme Court will hear oral arguments Tuesday on whether U.S.-based corporations can be sued in U.S. courts for human rights abuses committed overseas. The case involves nine Nigerian activists, including Ken Saro Wiwa, executed for protesting Royal Dutch Shell. We're joined by Marco Simons, legal director of Earth Rights International, which filed a "friend of the court" legal brief in this case and has been a pioneer in using the Alien Tort Statute to sue corporations for human rights abuses in Burma, Nigeria, Colombia and other nations. Some legal analysts are comparing the case to the landmark campaign finance ruling in Citizens United which found that corporations have broad rights under the First Amendment and can directly fund political campaigns.

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