10th OECD roundtable on corporate responsibility to focus on supply chains, human rights, environment & climate change (Paris, 30 Jun - 1 Jul)

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Article
30 June 2010

10th OECD Roundtable on Corporate Responsibility - Updating the Guidelines for Multinational Enterprises

Author: OECD

Every year, in conjunction with the Annual Meeting for National Contact Points, the OECD holds a roundtable on corporate responsibility addressing emerging issues and new developments. In April 2010, the 42 governments adhering to the Guidelines for Multinational Enterprises agreed on the Terms of Reference for an Update to the Guidelines...The Roundtable will bring together representatives from governments, business, labour, NGOs, international organisations, non-adhering governments and academia to focus on ways of clarifying or providing further guidance on the application of the Guidelines in 3 areas as outlined in the terms of reference: supply chains [,] human rights [,] environment and climate change...Further meeting documents will be posted on this page as they become available...The roundtable will be held at the OECD Conference Centre, 2 rue André-Pascal, 75016 Paris, France.

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Article
30 June 2010

[PDF] Assessing the contribution of the OECD Guidelines for Multinational Enterprises to responsible business conduct

Author: Joris Oldenziel (SOMO), Joseph Wilde-Ramsing (SOMO) & Patricia Feeney (RAID)

This report assesses the contribution of the OECD Guidelines to responsible business conduct, sustainable development, and the resolution and reduction of conflicts between companies and communities regarding social issues, environmental concerns, and human rights. In light of the 2010 revision, OECD Watch will make continuous contributions to the review of the Guidelines...This report is intended to make a constructive contribution to the review through a comprehensive, evidence-based, qualitative and quantitative analysis of the past 10 years of implementation of the Guidelines. It focuses on the experiences with the current (2000) version of the Guidelines which for the first time set up a complaints procedure that NGOs could use. It provides a selected case-by-case analysis of both the shortcomings and successes of the Guidelines. [refers to Accor, Adidas, Adidas Netherlands, Afrimex, Airbus (part of EADS), Aker Kvaerner, Alcoa, Alex Stewart, Anglo American, Anvil Mining, ANZ Bank, Ascendant Copper, Atlas Copco, Avient, Bayer, Belgolaise, BHP Billiton, Binani, Botnia, BP, Brylane (part of Pinault Printemps-Redoute), Cabot Corporation, Cermaq, Chongwon Fashion, Cogecom, ConocoPhilips, Continental, CPH, Daewoo, Das Air, Delta Hess (joint venture Amerada Hess & Delta Oil), Dexia, DLH, Electricité de France, ENI, ExxonMobil, Finnvera, First Mining, First Quantum, Fugro, George Forrest, Global Solutions, Goldcorp, Grupo Atlas Cumbres, G-Star, H.C.Starck, Il_Kyong, ING, Intex Resources, KBC, KfW, KOGAS, Kubbinga, Marathon Oil, Nami Gems, Transco (part of National Grid), Nike, NKG, Nutreco, OM Group, Oryx, Ratiopharm, Ridgepoint, Rio Tinto, Rolls Royce, Sandvik, Shell, SHV Holdings, Skanska, Statoil, Total, Toyota, Tractebel (part of Suez), Tremalt, Trinitech, Triumph International, Unocal (part of Chevron), Vattenfall, Vedanta, Volkswagen, Vortorantim, West LB, Xstrata]

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Article
30 June 2010

[PDF] The corporate responsibility to respect human rights in supply chains

Author: UN Special Representative John Ruggie

The corporate responsibility to respect human rights means to avoid infringing on the rights of others and addressing adverse impacts that may occur. This responsibility applies across an enterprise’s activities and through its relationships with other parties, such as business partners, entities in its value chain, other non-state actors and state agents. Suppliers have the same responsibility to respect human rights as any other business entity. However, this note focuses on enterprises that purchase goods and services from suppliers. It outlines a decision logic for them to manage adverse human rights impacts in their supply chains and meet their responsibility to respect human rights.

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Article
30 June 2010

[PDF] Updating the guidelines for multinational enterprises - discussion paper

Author: Professor John Ruggie, Special Representative of the UN Secretary-General on Human Rights and Transnational Corporations and other Business Enterprises

This note identifies the main human rights elements the update should include if it is to meet its goal of ensuring “the continued role of the Guidelines as a leading international instrument for the promotion of responsible business conduct.” It also addresses related procedural provisions. The note is based on the “Protect, Respect and Remedy” Framework proposed by the SRSG and welcomed unanimously by the UN Human Rights Council in June 2008. Its structure broadly follows the agreed terms of reference for the Guidelines’ update...Current language in the Guidelines reflects neither the needs of, nor best practices by, multinational enterprises when facing challenging human rights situations...Principles for effective non-judicial grievance mechanisms...

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Article
1 July 2010

Call for shake-up on company conduct

Author: Vanessa Houlder, Financial Times

Only five complaints against multinationals brought by ethical campaigners over the past decade resulted in concrete improvements, according to non-governmental organisations calling for “radical reforms” of international guidelines on social, environmental and labour issues. A year-long revision of official guidelines on multinationals’ conduct…is the latest attempt to step up defences against environmental destruction and human rights abuses by companies operating in the developing world, often within the supply chains of big multinationals. OECD Watch, a network of 88 non-governmental organisations from 45 countries…said: “If no drastic improvements are achieved, civil society will be forced to look elsewhere to resolve the key problems facing affected peoples and the natural environment.”

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