African Commission experts, ISHR and Central Africa civil society discuss about the challenges corporate accountability defenders are facing in the region

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Article
27 July 2015

Corporate accountability defenders in Central Africa: ‘troublemakers’ offer solutions

Author: International Service for Human Rights, Geneva

Corporate accountability defenders in Central Africa: ‘troublemakers’ offer solutions - See more at: http://www.ishr.ch/news/corporate-accountability-defenders-central-afric...

Corporate accountability defenders in Central Africa: ‘troublemakers’ offer solutions - See more at: http://www.ishr.ch/news/corporate-accountability-defenders-central-afric...
Corporate accountability defenders in Central Africa: ‘troublemakers’ offer solutions - See more at: http://www.ishr.ch/news/corporate-accountability-defenders-central-afric...
Corporate accountability defenders in Central Africa: ‘troublemakers’ offer solutions - See more at: http://www.ishr.ch/news/corporate-accountability-defenders-central-afric...
Corporate accountability defenders in Central Africa: ‘troublemakers’ offer solutions - See more at: http://www.ishr.ch/news/corporate-accountability-defenders-central-afric...

Corporate accountability defenders in Central Africa: ‘troublemakers’ offer solutions - See more at: http://www.ishr.ch/news/corporate-accountability-defenders-central-afric...

Corporate accountability defenders in Central Africa: ‘troublemakers’ offer solutions - See more at: http://www.ishr.ch/news/corporate-accountability-defenders-central-afric...

At the third of five sub-regional consultations by African Commission experts, ISHR drew attention to regional trends in central Africa related to the intersection of extractive industry activities, government policy, and challenges to human rights defenders. Testimonies from national organisations working to improve respect for the rights of individuals and communities affected by natural resource exploitation highlighted gaps in legislation, insufficient knowledge, immense power imbalances, and inadequate implementation as key drivers of vulnerability and abuse...From 13 to 15 July, the African Commission’s Working Group on Extractives Industries, the Environment and Human Rights – whose mandate includes examining the impacts of the extractive industries on human rights violations and environment – heard testimonies from national and regional civil society representatives who work on corporate accountability issues. The Working Group aims of this consultations were to examine the impact of extractive industries on human rights, and to solicit recommendations to the Working Group, among other stakeholders, to improve respect for human rights in the area of natural resources management.

 

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Article
1 July 2015

Troublemakers’ and "foreign agents": The situation of corporate human rights defenders in Central Africa. Submission to the African Commission on Human and Peoples’ Rights Working Group on Extractive Industries, Environment and Human Rights Violations

Author: International Service for Human Rights, Geneva

The International Service for Human Rights (ISHR) makes this submission to the Working Group on Extractive Industries, Environment and Human Rights Violations of the African Commission on Human and People's Rights (ACHRP), as a follow-up to its presentation at the Central Africa Sub-Regional Consultation, which took place from 13-15 July 2015 in Lubumbashi, Democratic Republic of Congo...This submission uses engagement with the Extractive Industries Transparency Initiative (EITI) as a common benchmark for transparency and multistakeholder engagement around extractives. However, it must be noted that a more extensive review of international multistakeholder or ‘CSR’ efforts, including with international financial institutions, may better reflect the attitudes and actions of extractives industries towards human rights defenders and host governments...the submission contains case studies of the following countries: Cameroon, Chad, Central African Republic, Democratic Republic of Congo, Equatorial Guinea, Gabon, and Republic of Congo-Brazzaville...For each country, the submission provides a brief overview of the nature and significance of the extractive sector and the EITI status of the country. It also provides a summary of the operating environment for human rights defenders working in the field of business and human rights in the country...The submission concludes with concrete recommendations to the Working Group, Governments and corporations to promote corporate respect for human rights and a safe and enabling environment for human rights defenders working on extractive industry issues.  

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