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Updating the Resource Centre Digital Platform

The Business & Human Rights Resource Centre is at a critical point in its development. Our digital platform is home to a wealth of information on business and human rights, but hasn’t had a visual refresh for a number of years.

We will soon be updating the site to improve its usability and better serve the thousands of people that use our site to support their work.

Please take an advance peek at our new look, and let us know what you think!

Thank you,
Alex Guy, Digital Officer

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en/international-scientific-body-report-on-climate-change-warns-of-need-to-act-now-to-prevent-catastrophic-impacts-of-climate-change#c178044

Amnesty International warns that failure to act swiftly on climate change risks human rights violation on massive scale, and that even carbon removal is likely to violate human rights

Author: Amnesty International, Published on: 11 October 2018

"Amnesty warns that most options to remove carbon that has already been emitted will also likely violate human rights

With countless people worldwide already suffering the catastrophic effects of floods, heatwaves and droughts aggravated by climate change, governments must commit to much more ambitious emissions reduction targets to limit the global average temperature increase, or bear responsibility for loss of life and other human rights violations and abuses on an unprecedented scale...

Climate change mitigation measures that have not been human rights compliant have already resulted in violations. For example, in May 2018 Amnesty International documented how the Sengwer Indigenous people of Embobut Forest, Kenya were forced from their homes, sometimes with deadly force, and dispossessed of their ancestral lands as a result of a government drive to reduce deforestation. The government accuses the Sengwer of harming the forest, but has not provided any evidence for that claim.

Such projects should always be subject to human rights impact assessments before going ahead in order to accurately assess the potential harm."

Read the full post here