hide message

Welcome to the Resource Centre

We make it our mission to work with advocates in civil society, business and government to address inequalities of power, seek remedy for abuse, and ensure protection of people and planet.

Both companies and impacted communities thank us for the resources and support we provide.

This is only possible because of your support. Please make a donation today.

Thank you,
Phil Bloomer, Executive Director

Donate now hide message

Australia: Qantas urged to review involuntary transportation process; co. said it's not for airlines to adjudicate deportations

Qantas' shareholders pressure the airline to review its role in deporting asylum seekers. The Australasian Centre for Corporate Responsibility has filed a resolution urging Qantas to conduct and publish a human rights risk review. However, Qantas said that deportation is a matter for the government and for the courts to decide on.

Get RSS feed of these results

All components of this story

Article
27 October 2019

Qantas shareholders reject AGM resolution on asylum seekers

Author: Kelly Burke, 7 News

25 October 2019

Qantas shareholders ...voted down a resolution on asylum seekers at the airline's AGM...

But both sides appear to be claiming victory.

Fewer than one in four shareholders supported the resolution to force Qantas to review its policy on participating in the deportation of failed asylum seekers, with the move securing just 23.56 per cent of votes.

But the refugee advocates behind the resolution described the result as "an unprecedented moment in Australian corporate history"...

Read the full post here

Article
21 October 2019

Qantas faces mounting pressure to cease assisting government in deporting asylum seekers

Author: Kelly Burke, 7NEWS

16 October 2019

Qantas will face shareholder pressure over its role in deporting asylum seekers at its annual general meeting in Adelaide....

The Australasian Centre for Corporate Responsibility (ACCR) has filed a resolution calling on CEO Alan Joyce and the Qantas board to review the airline's participation in the involuntary transportation of refugees and asylum seekers.

[...]

"(Qantas') provision of services to the Department of Home Affairs necessarily involves salient human rights risks, and the company has not yet developed or disclosed a commensurate process to manage these risks."

[...]

But the airline says when it comes to Australia's asylum seeker policy, the government and the courts are best placed to decide on individuals' legal immigration status.

A spokesman for Qantas...: "These are very complex and emotive matters but it's not for airlines to adjudicate on who should and shouldn't get to stay in Australia after the government and courts have made their decisions."

But ACCR's Director of Human Rights, Dhakshayini Sooriyakumaran, said the resolution to shareholders was not asking Qantas to adjudicate on immigration matters.

[...]

"(We're) simply asking Qantas to carry out a human rights risk review and make public the results. Shareholders should be concerned that Qantas has consistently refused to do this."

[...]

Read the full post here

Article
11 September 2019

The 8000 'forced movements' on Australian flights in two years

Author: Nick O'Malley, The Sydney Morning Herald

7 September 2019

The Department of Home Affairs used Australian airlines and charter companies for more than 8000 involuntary movements of people in the immigration detention system, including transfers and deportations, over two years between July 2017 and May 2019.

...Australasian Centre for Corporate Responsibility['s]...campaign comes as controversy grows about the plight of a Tamil family which is facing deportation....

...ACCR...will put forward a resolution at the Qantas annual general meeting in October that would see Qantas review its "involuntary transportation" process, taking UN human rights guidelines into consideration.

...A spokesman for Qantas said: "These are very complex and emotive matters but it's not for airlines to adjudicate on who should and shouldn't get to stay in Australia after the government and courts have made their decisions."

The ACCR's director of human rights, Dhakshayini Sooriyakumaran...:

"Qantas shareholders have no information about their company's involvement in these 8000 movements which are part of a system that has been roundly criticised by domestic and international human rights bodies."

Read the full post here