Bangladesh: Four months on, families of victims of Rana Plaza building collapse still waiting for adequate compensation

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Article
7 September 2015

Bangladesh lifts ban on a controversial movie about its garment industry

Author: Jennifer Swann, www.takepart.com

A garment worker's rescue from the rubble of a Bangladeshi factory collapse in 2013 offered a Hollywood ending to one of the world's worst industrial disasters...But when a local filmmaker decided to make a movie based on the miraculous survival story, a court banned its release in Bangladesh last month on the premise that it could negatively affect the country's labor force...a panel of four judges had a change of heart and agreed to lift the restriction...The reversal came at the insistence of the movie's producer, Shamima Akhter, who reasoned that Rana Plaza—named after the now infamous factory—had already been approved by Bangladesh's Film Censor Board. 

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Article
2 August 2015

Where Did You Get That Dress?: Bangladesh Two Years on From Rana Plaza

Author: Shannon K. O'Neil, Council on Foreign Relations

On April 24, 2013, the Rana Plaza factory...collapsed in Dhaka, Bangladesh...Rana Plaza highlights both the best and the worst of what globalization and global supply chains bring to developing countries...This trade has helped fundamentally change Bangladeshi society, in many ways for the better...Yet the industry also pays poorly and restricts union membership. Workers routinely suffer from respiratory diseases, injuries, and even death...The often blatant disregard for labor rights and safety standards comes in part from the way these supply chains function...The response to the Rana Plaza collapse also underscores the good and the bad of this global commercial connectedness...As Bangladesh struggles to improve wages and working conditions, the public and private sectors worry about losing the industry and its jobs.

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Article
7 June 2015

Bangladesh: Funds for Rana Plaza victims reach $30m target

Author: Clean Clothes Campaign

The Clean Clothes Campaign...announce a major campaign victory with the confirmation that the Rana Plaza Donors Trust Fund has finally met its target of $30 million, following a large anonymous donation...The CCC has been campaigning since the disaster in April 2013 to demand that brands and retailers provided compensation to its victims...Since then over one million consumers from across Europe and around the world have joined actions against many of the major high street companies whose products were being made in one of the five factories housed in the structurally compromised building. 

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Article
18 August 2013

Bangladesh’s Workers Deserve Better [Bangladesh]

Author: Editorial, New York Times

Four months after a building collapse killed more than 1,100 factory workers in Bangladesh, their families are still waiting for adequate — and in some cases, any — compensation…The money was supposed to come from the government and from private donations by, among others, the factory owners...But the government has yet to distribute most of that money…many of the remaining families have not received any aid at all because the government has not moved fast enough to identify nearly 300 bodies…So far, with the exception of the British retailer Primark, they have not provided any compensation

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Article
18 August 2013

Lessons of Dhaka: the united action plan that could prevent sweatshop disasters [Bangladesh]

Author: Aron Carmer, BSR in Global : the international briefing

The factory collapse at Rana Plaza in Dhaka, which claimed 1,127 lives, has refocused the world’s attention on the plight of underpaid, overworked garment workers in developing countries…As these distressing events continue to unfold, it is time to pursue new actions…First, governments need to get back in the game…policing factories is less important than implementing responsible purchasing practices…technology may be part of the solution…while attention tends to fix on individual brands, collaboration is the only way to achieve systemic change…Each of these ideas has the potential to improve workers’ lives, health and dignity, while creating a stable, sustainable supply chain. But real progress will happen only when all of them are pursued together.

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