BGMEA [Bangladesh Garment Manufacturers and Exporters Association] leaders call on law adviser: Punishment for NGOs tarnishing Bangladesh’s image urged

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Article
5 October 2017

Bangladesh: Official data shows half of garment factories do not form safety committees as legally required

Author: Readymade Garment Bangladesh

"Half of apparel units flout needs for safety committees", 23 Sep 2017

Nearly half of the country’s ready-made garment (RMG) factories are yet to set up their safety committees despite having legal compulsion... Recent findings of the Department of Inspection for Factories and Establishment (DIFE) under the ministry of labour and employment revealed that some 2,174 safety committees were formed...About 4,795 garment factories are operating across the country....Any factory that employs 50 or more workers must form a safety committee, which would function as per...the law amended in 2013...[T]he rules published in September 2015, the existing factories have to form such committees within six months from the date the rules come into effect, while the factories, set up after the formulation of the rules, have to do it within nine months after production starts....The regular inspection conducted by DIFE inspectors found that the rate of forming safety committee and other compliance issues in garment factories, affiliated with either the Bangladesh Garment Manufacturers and Exporters Association (BGMEA) and the Bangladesh Knitwear Manufacturers and Exporters Association (BKMEA), is relatively poor...

 

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Article
12 April 2007

BGMEA [Bangladesh Garment Manufacturers and Exporters Association] leaders call on law adviser: Punishment for NGOs tarnishing Bangladesh’s image urged

Author: New Nation [Bangladesh]

Apex apparel body BGMEA demanded stern actions against local and international agencies which are involved in tarnishing image of the garment sector of Bangladesh abroad through negative propaganda...According to the BGMEA leaders, US-based National Labour Committee (NLC) in cooperation with the Bangladesh Centre for Workers Solidarity (BCWS) was making all-out efforts to tarnish the image of the country...Parvez [president of the organisation Anwarul Alam Chowdhury Parvez] said there is not child labour in Bangladesh's garment factories and different international agencies like ILO and UNICEF is working with the BGMEA in this regard.

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Article
26 October 2006

Wal-Mart website: "Ethical Standards Program"

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Article
26 October 2006

Puma website: "Corporate Social Responsibility"

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Article
26 October 2006

JC Penney website: "Supplier programs - Legal Compliance"

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Article
26 October 2006

Hanesbrands website: "Our values"

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Article
23 October 2006

Write a Letter to Hanes, Wal-Mart, Puma and J.C. Penney - More than 100 Child Workers Fired from Harvest Rich [Bangladesh]

Author: National Labor Committee [US-based NGO]

After threatening to sue the National Labor Committee and after stating that Harvest Rich was “free of child labor,” that “adhering to company policy, we do not employ anyone below 18” and that “Harvest Rich Ltd. has a...valid WRAP Certification”..., Harvest Rich fired more than 100 child workers while at the same time threatening that any worker found cooperating with the independent investigation...will also be fired... After receiving a letter from the National Labor Committee, Harvest Rich seems to be re-evaluating the mass firing... On Sunday, October 22, Harvest Rich managers held an hour-long meeting with the child workers, telling them that they were not fired and should return to the factory on Saturday, October 28 after the Eid religious holiday. The children were told that at that time management would decide to go ahead with the mass firings or pay for the children’s education... On one hand, Harvest Rich’s backing off from the firings is a very positive step forward... On the other hand, the question again arises, how Hanes [part of Hanesbrands], Puma, Wal-Mart and J.C. Penney could all have failed to notice that children as young as 11 were sewing their clothing...

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