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Stock exchange symbol: (BP/:LN)

Does your company have a publicly available commitment to respect human rights?

Yes, stand-alone human rights policy: [link]

BP’s human rights policy elaborates on the requirement within our code of conduct to treat everyone at BP - and everyone with whom we come into contact - with fairness, respect and dignity

This policy applies to every BP employee and officer in BP wholly-owned entities, and in joint ventures to the extent possible and reasonable given BP’s level of participation. It contains the following seven commitments:

• We conduct our business in a manner that respects the rights and dignity of all people, complying with all legal requirements.

• We respect internationally recognized human rights, as set out in the International Bill of Human Rights and the International Labour Organization’s declaration on Fundamental Principles and Rights at Work.

• We recognize our responsibility to respect human rights and avoid complicity in human rights abuses, as stated in the UN Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights.

• We treat everyone who works for BP fairly and without discrimination. Our employees, agency staff and suppliers are entitled to work in an environment and under conditions that respect their rights and dignity.

• We respect freedom of association. Where our employees wish to be represented by trade unions or works councils, we will cooperate in good faith with the bodies that our employees collectively choose to represent them within the appropriate national legal frameworks.

• We respect the rights of people in communities impacted by our activities. We will seek to identify adverse human rights impacts and take appropriate steps to avoid, minimize and/or mitigate them.

• We will seek to make contractual commitments with suppliers that encourage them to adhere to the same principles.

See also: Code of Conduct [link]

How are human rights governed in your company?

We have created an action plan designed to achieve closer alignment with the Guiding Principles over a number of years and plan to monitor the effectiveness of these actions. Senior representatives from key functions, including human resources, ethics and compliance, procurement, security and safety and operational risk oversee the implementation. Progress is reported to the group operations risk committee, which is chaired by BP’s group chief executive.

How are human rights managed within your company?

We work with industry groups to help develop and drive good practice guidance. For example, we have helped lead the development of IPIECA’s guidance on integrating human rights into environmental and social impact assessments. While BP has previously conducted dedicated human rights impact assessments and has considered human rights as part of other impact assessments, this is a complex topic, and we hope that the new guidance will make it easier for practitioners to bring a human rights lens to the process.

As a multinational oil and gas company, human rights are relevant to aspects of our business activities, so we are using a risk-based approach to achieve closer alignment with the UN Guiding Principles. We are working with key functions and selected priority businesses to raise awareness of potential human rights impacts and risks, and our responsibility to address these, as outlined in BP’s human rights policy. At our training sessions this year we found that discussing human rights in practical terms, such as workforce welfare land acquisition and security, and analysing specific examples or scenarios from business, helped participants to better understand the relationship between business and human rights.

What is the company’s approach to the engagement of stakeholders (including workers, and local communities impacted by the company’s activities), on human rights issues?

Our ability to operate safely and continuously depends not only on obtaining the necessary official permits from the authorities, but also on the informal permission or social licence to operate that communities in the surrounding area can choose to give or withhold.

BP’s activities have the potential to impact communities positively and negatively. Projects that are subject to our environmental and social practices ([link]) are required to conduct impact assessments. We consult with communities about potential environmental and socio-economic impacts and develop plans to manage these.

For examples of our community engagement see here: [link]

Priority human rights issues: What are some of the priority human rights issues for your company?

The company selected the following from a check list:

  • Health (including workplace health & safety, prevention of pollution)
  • Displacement and community relocation
  • Relations with security providers
  • Indigenous peoples

Actions on health

Safety is one of BP’s values, and everything BP aims to do relies upon the safety of our workforce and the communities around us. Our operating management system contains requirements related to risk assessment, personal safety, process safety and health and industrial hygiene, which help us to operate effectively and reliably.

How we manage safety [link]

As part of our environmental and social practices, we seek to prevent, manage or mitigate potential impacts on community health, through project screening, impact assessment and mitigations.

Actions on displacement and community relocation

Our environmental and social practices require that projects do not permanently move a community from its principal place of dwelling. If no workable alternative can be found, projects can seek senior management approval for an exception to this requirement, subject to appropriate community consultation, impact mitigation measures and any other approvals required under local laws.

Land acquisition and resettlement [link]

Community engagement [link]

In two projects where physical or economic displacement occurred, our multi-year resettlement action plans were evaluated and reported on by independent panels.

Tangguh resettlement action plan [link]

BTC resettlement action plans [link]

Actions on access to water

We have commissioned research on the governance, allocation and use of water in the Middle East. This will provide BP with improved understanding of how water resources will be allocated between communities, agriculture, energy and industry.

Actions on relations with security providers

Where risk assessments indicate it is needed, we seek to engage with the security forces that protect our assets to help them understand the human rights of our workforce and communities living near our operations and to interact responsibly with them.

Wherever possible we seek to prevent the use of armed security personnel. For example, at our LNG plant in Tangguh, Indonesia we train community members to carry out site security activities.

Security and human rights [link]

Actions on indigenous peoples

We acknowledge the importance of respecting the unique cultures and ways of life of indigenous communities. BP projects subject to our environmental and social practices are required to identify, understand and manage potential impacts on indigenous peoples, including developing a consultation plan and impact mitigation measures that take account of local circumstances, customs and culture.

Indigenous peoples [link]

Community engagement: Community consultation in Indonesia [link]

How are human rights commitments and information about how the company addresses its human rights impacts communicated, internally and externally?

BP's sustainability reporting suite includes a concise, downloadable Sustainability Review, full reporting on the BP website, country reports and site reports. See [link] [link] [link]

Our online reporting also includes tools and case studies, which demonstrate our sustainability efforts in action around the world. See [link] [link]

Our reporting is aimed at our key stakeholders - those who are affected by our organization and who affect us. Our primary audiences for this report are employees, shareholders and analysts, governments and regulators, business partners, non-governmental organizations, the local communities in which we operate and industry associations.

Our ability to operate safely and continuously depends not only on obtaining the necessary official permits from the authorities, but also on the informal permission or social licence to operate that communities in the surrounding area can choose to give or withhold.

BP’s activities have the potential to impact communities positively and negatively. Projects that are subject to our environmental and social practices are required to conduct impact assessments. We consult with communities about potential environmental and socio-economic impacts and develop plans to manage these.  See [link]

For examples of our community engagement, see here: [link]

See also: 2012 Sustainability Review; [link]  2011 Sustainability Review [link]

What provisions does your company have in place to ensure that grievances from workers and affected communities or individuals are heard, and can you provide examples of remedies provided?

We believe that open dialogue helps to build strong, mutually beneficial working relationships, and enables both sides to work through any disagreements.

Our operating managing system ([link]) requires our businesses to have a process for receiving communications from key communities and stakeholders and to document responses. In 2013, most of the complaints raised by communities living near our major operating sites were related to operational impacts such as odour and noise. Our businesses are also required to record and take action on any external commitments they make to key communities and stakeholders.

We are working with oil and gas industry association IPIECA to develop guidance on managing community grievances. This is expected to be finalized in 2014, and we plan to test its suitability for incorporation into our training and capability development.

IPIECA Operational level grievance mechanisms [link]

Which external and collaborative human rights initiatives does your company participate in, and what is the nature of your involvement?

We are a signatory to two voluntary agreements with implications for specific aspects of human rights: the UN Global Compact, which includes principles on protecting internationally proclaimed human rights, and the Voluntary Principles on Security and Human Rights, which define good practice for security operations in the extractive industry.

We work with industry groups to help develop and drive good practice guidance. For example, we have helped lead the development of IPIECA’s guidance on integrating human rights into environmental and social impact assessments.

Which are the key one, two or three elements of your approach to human rights that been developed or amended since June 2011? Please indicate if these actions were in response to the UN Guiding Principles.

Planned action for 2013:

Develop and implement human rights training for high-priority businesses and functions

What we did:

  • Conducted 21 dedicated human rights training events for more than 400 people, including workshops for senior leaders in Indonesia and the Middle East and awareness and sensitization training for people in priority job types and businesses.
  • Developed human rights material for use in existing training programmes.

Planned action for 2013:

Develop guidance on community grievance processes and integrating human rights into impact assessments

What we did:

  • Worked with oil and gas industry association IPIECA to help develop industry guidance and tools for community grievance mechanisms and for integration of human rights into environmental and social impact assessments.
  • Included human rights in our impact assessment for the LNG expansion project in Tangguh, Indonesia.

Planned action for 2013:

Embed human rights requirements into our procurement and supply chain management processes

What we did:

  • Developed a pre-qualification questionnaire for suppliers in our Downstream business that included aspects of human rights.
  • Participated in IPIECA’s supply chain taskforce on developing shared industry approaches to managing human rights risks in the supply chain.
  • Developed minimum workforce welfare standards for our Oman Khazzan project that set requirements for contractors with respect to the working and living conditions of the project workforce.

For more details on progress since 2011, see previous sustainability reports, especially page 44 of 2012 Sustainability Review: [link]