Critical analysis of National Action Plans on business & human rights by Homa Centre for Human Rights & Business (Brazil)

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Homa, the Centre for Human Rights and Business of the Law School of the Federal University of Juiz de Fora, Brazil, released results of the first part of a research started in September 2015. The first study offers critical analysis and recommendations on the National Action Plans on Business and Human Rights that had been published when the Centre was conducting the research. See below.

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Article
25 January 2016

Critical analysis of National Action Plans on business & human rights by Homa Centre for Human Rights & Business (Brazil)

Author: Homa-Centre for Human Rights and Business of the Law School of the Fed.Univ. Juiz de Fora (Brazil)

“Homa launches first of a series of papers about National Action Plans on Business and Human Rights”, 25 January, 2016

...The investigations for development of a series of papers about the National Action Plans on Business and Human Rights were motivated by the...need for a critical academic follow up of the process of elaboration of a NAP in Brazil...This series aims to contribute with the players involved in this process, that’s why it was named “National Action Plans on Human Rights and Business: Inputs for the Brazilian Reality”. According to the theoretical perspective of Homa, it was decided to place “Human Rights” before “Business” in the series’ title since we believe  that these plans should be developed by putting the Human Rights dimension first, rather than business and market demands...[T]he Centre looks forward to conduct critical research,...to provide an analysis about the social practices with potential for contributing to the reality’s transformation...[I]ts goal is to bring forth a general approach to the released NAPs, highlighting...problems and critics, aiming at the elaboration of a more objective instrument, capable of producing measurable, rateable and concrete results, gathering...civil society, social movements and victims of Human Rights violations...

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Article
25 January 2016

Critical analysis of National Action Plans on business & human rights by Homa Centre for Human Rights & Business (Brazil)

Author: Homa-Centre for Human Rights and Business of the Law School of the Fed.Univ. Juiz de Fora (Brazil)

“National Action Plans on Human Rights and Business: inputs for the Brazilian Reality-Part I: General Perspective on the National Action Plans on Business and Human Rights”, January 2016

...This   research   began   in   September   2015...motivated by...the need  for  a  critical  academic  monitoring  of the elaboration process of the National Action Plan by Brazil...[T]his series...will be made  up  of...:...a  brief  historical  introduction  of  the  scenario  of  the  United  Nations in the area, to...the debate of  the  National  Plans,  bringing...general   considerations   on   the   initiative   and identifying   guiding   points   on   the   eight plans already developed...[T]he  experience  of  existing  national  plans shows...these  neither  have...the potential for an effective progress in  the  development  of  national  legislation and public policies for human rights protection  against  violations  committed  by  companies,  nor contribute  to  the  full  access  to justice  and  to  ensure  that...victims  are able   to   achieve   repair...The  measures  proposed...do not  provide  enforcement  mechanisms,  do not have a clear methodology of evaluation and  monitoring..., and...do  not  have  any  level  of  "punishability” for     companies     that...violate human  rights,  nor  to  the  State,  in  case it  does  not  fulfill  the  proposals  agreed  in the plans...[They]...should   focus   on   human  rights  and  victims,  guided  by  the  logic  of International  Human  Rights  Law,  and  recognize  the structural  imbalance  between violators  of  human  rights  and  victims,  in this  case,  businesses  and  affected  communities...

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