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en/online-discussion-with-unicef-on-how-businesses-can-better-assess-their-impact-on-childrens-rights-17-jan#c70639

Child rights: assessing the business impacts - live discussion round up

Author: Hannah Gould, Guardian [UK], Published on: 13 February 2013

For international companies developing a culture that supports child rights, everything has to start with understanding impacts and aligning your priorities with those of the countries you operate in...[By] first understanding the impact and risk of your business, philanthropic activities can be more strategic [said Milka Pietikainen from Millicom]...Unicef's Viktor Nylund [says] that engaging with children as stakeholders in the due diligence process is challenging and stresses that children must be stakeholders not simply for the sake of it, but to serve their rights and best interests...[Matthias] Leisinger [corporate responsibility vice president for Kuoni] believes the business world understands the relevance of the Principles, but implementation proves the big challenge. The sticking point comes at translating the technical language into business priorities...[but according to Milka Pietikainen] the work Unicef and DIHR are doing to help businesses translate the Principles into assessment tools, is a good start.

Read the full post here

Related companies: Kuoni Millicom