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Civil society faces increasing difficulty in performing role 'effectively', report on 5 EU countries finds; highlights link to social & labour rights

Civil society in five EU countries say they face increasing difficulty in carrying out their role effectively due to 'insufficient meaningful participation' in decision-making processes, and claim national authorities do not sufficiently prioritise the funding of important civil society tasks such as monitoring and watchdog activites. These are some of the key findings of a report on civil society rights in Poland, Hungary, Romania, Austria and France, published by the European Economic and Social Committee (EESC) in November 2019.

In response to the findings, the head of the EESC employers' group, said that "the rule of law was important for the economy as a whole, and a precondition for the mutual trust on which the internal market relies", while the lead of the workers' group emphasized that "civil and political rights cannot be separated from social and labour rights, such as the right to strike and freedom of expression, which are necessary to fight for better working and living conditions."

More information including the report "National developments from a civil society perspective" is available below.

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Article
8 November 2019

Civil society bemoans increasing difficulty in performing role 'effectively'

Author: Martin Banks, The Parliament Magazine

The groups in various EU countries say this is partly due to “insufficient meaningful participation” of civil society in the decision-making process.

It is also claimed that national authorities do not “prioritise sufficiently” the funding of “vital” civil society tasks, such as monitoring and watchdog activities.

These are among the key findings of a delegation the European Economic and Social Committee (EESC) sent to probe civil society rights in five countries: Poland, Hungary, Romania, Austria and France...

Commenting on the findings, EESC president Luca Jahier said, "What we need is an ambitious and comprehensive response to challenges to fundamental rights and the rule of law. This should concern every Member State, all EU institutions and civil society.” ...

Jacek Krawczyk, who heads the EESC employers' group, said, “The rule of law was important for the economy as a whole, and a precondition for the mutual trust on which the internal market relies.” 

Oliver Ropke, who leads the institution’s workers' group, said, “Civil and political rights cannot be separated from social and labour rights, such as the right to strike and freedom of expression, which are necessary to fight for better working and living conditions.”

Read the full post here

Report
5 November 2019

National developments from a civil society perspective, 2018-2019

Author: European Economic and Social Committee

Read the full post here