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Commentaries on potential human rights & environmental impacts by China-led Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank (AIIB)

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Author: 刘珞焱, 路透社

"金立群称亚投行将秉持精干、廉洁和绿色理念",2015年4月13日

亚洲基础设施投资银行(亚投行)多边临时秘书处秘书长金立群称,亚投行的核心理念是精干、廉洁、绿色,欲以此减轻外界对亚投行透明度和治理标准的担忧...精干是精简高效,廉洁是指亚投行将对腐败零容忍,而绿色是指亚投行将促进经济发展...亚投行意向创始成员国目前已经超过40个,美国与日本缺席美国此前曾质疑亚投行在治理能力、环境和社会保障上是否具有高标准。

 

 

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Author: 劉珞焱, 路透社

"金立群稱亞投行將秉持精幹、廉潔和綠色理念",2015年4月13日

亞洲基礎設施投資銀行(亞投行)多邊臨時秘書處秘書長金立群稱,亞投行的核心理念是精幹、廉潔、綠色,欲以此減輕外界對亞投行透明度和治理標準的擔憂... 精幹是精簡高效,廉潔是指亞投行將對腐敗零容忍,而綠色是指亞投行將促進經濟發展...亞投行意向創始成員國目前已經超過40個,美國與日本缺席。美國此前曾質疑亞投行在治理能力、環境和社會保障上是否具有高標準。

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Article
13 April 2015

China-led Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank (AIIB) interim chief says the bank will be "lean, clean & green"

Author: Michael Martina, Reuters

"China-led AIIB will be lean, clean and green - official", 11th April 2015

The China-led Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank (AIIB) will be lean, clean and green, its interim chief said..."Lean is cost effective; clean, this bank will have zero- tolerance on corruption; green means it's going to promote the economy," China's Xinhua news agency quoted Jin Liqun, secretary general of the bank's multilateral interim secretariat...More than 40 countries have applied to join the AIIB, with the United States and Japan being notable absentees...Washington has questioned whether the AIIB will have sufficient standards of governance and environmental and social safeguards.

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Article
18 March 2015

Why human rights objections to China’s version of the World Bank ring false

Author: Jake Flanagin, Quartz

...China announced the establishment of the AIIB in Oct. 2013. A year later, 21 countries—including key US allies like India and the Philippines—signed on...According to The New York Times, “...the new bank would fail to meet environmental standards, procurement requirements and other safeguards adopted by the World Bank and the Asian Development Bank, including protections intended to prevent the forced removal of vulnerable populations from their lands.”...World Bank is hardly the world’s foremost champion for human rights in the developing world...although the World Bank has safe-guards in place to protect the vulnerable populations...they appear to be more regularly neglected than enforced...Amnesty International publicly condemned a World Bank-funded project in Lagos, Nigeria...A 59-page report compiled by Human Rights Watch highlights similar trends at the World Bank...

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Article
8 October 2014

U.S. Opposing China’s Answer to World Bank

Author: Jane Perlez, New York Times

…China has been pitching an idea to its neighbors in Asia: a big, internationally funded bank that would offer quick financing for badly needed transportation, telecommunications and energy projects in underdeveloped countries across the region…But the United States…especially on issues such as climate change and arms proliferation, has not embraced the Chinese proposal…Beijing has asked dozens of nations to contribute funds to…Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank…

A senior Obama administration official said the Treasury Department had concluded that the new bank would fail to meet environmental standards, procurement requirements and other safeguards adopted by the World Bank and the Asian Development Bank, including protections intended to prevent the forced removal of vulnerable populations from their lands…

Clay Lowery, a senior United States Treasury official from 2005 to 2009, said the Obama administration’s objections are not entirely well founded. The Chinese plan, he argued, “could be a positive development — potentially a great way to get Asian countries to work together on significant financial needs in the region.”

Last year, the United States said it would oppose financing of coal-fired power plants by the Asian Development Bank because of concerns about global warming. And early this year, Washington said it would not support construction of dams by the bank if they displaced people from their homes.

“Energy is one of the biggest needs of economic growth in Asia, and China will be able to promise projects without these hindrances,” said a senior A.D.B. official…

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