Corporate Human Rights Benchmark releases 2018 ranking results on human rights performance of 101 companies

CHRB licensed under CC Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0

Today (12 November), the Corporate Human Rights Benchmark released the results of its 2018 ranking. The benchmark assesses the human rights policies, processes, and practices of 101 of the world's largest publicly traded companies in three at-risk sectors (apparel, agricultural products, and extractives).

The 2018 results show that the majority of companies are still not demonstrating sufficient respect for human rights, the overall average score being just 27%. Nevertheless, the benchmark also finds that there is a welcome group of leading companies. The report detailing the benchmark's key findings is available below.

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Article
14 November 2018

Investors need data to to evaluate companies’ human rights performance [subscription only]

Author: Responsible Investor

Dutch civil service pension giant ABP has welcomed the launch of the new Corporate Human Rights Benchmark (CHRB), a new ranking backed by investors, saying it needs the data to be able to evaluate companies’ performance on the issue...

...“We really need the data,” said ABP Vice-Chair José Meijer at a launch event in London yesterday. “Then we can make better decisions.”...

...She said the CHRB data helps it to identify leaders and laggards amongst companies as an aid to engagement and to ensure firms’ deliver on their “beloften” (the Dutch word for ‘promises’)....

 

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Article
14 November 2018

New human rights ranking shows most firms have barely left the starting line

Author: Phil Bloomer, Business & Human Rights Resource Centre, in Ethical Corporation

The first full version of the Corporate Human Rights Benchmark is published today, with key findings on companies in the apparel, agricultural products and extractives sectors. The results reveal that there is a race to the top in business and human rights performance, but only amongst a welcome cluster of leaders. The great majority have barely left the starting line, with 40 of the 101 companies surveyed failing to show any evidence of identifying or mitigating human rights issues in their supply chains....

There were alarmingly low scores in some areas of systemic challenge, which serves to highlight how far business has to go. The alignment of purchasing practices with human rights is not easy, but without this, in food and apparel, abuse in their complex global supply chains is inevitable. Very low average scores were also recorded for commitments to living wages, which are fundamental to achieving a decent life, especially for women workers; and policies to protect increasingly threatened human rights defenders in supply chains, whose work is vital to uncover abuse and dangers for both communities and workers....

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Article
12 November 2018

Companies Fail to Meet Human-Rights Benchmark

Author: Wall Street Journal

Major companies in the resource extraction, agricultural and clothing industries are failing to demonstrate respect for human rights, according to a study based on principles from the United Nations... 

...It also uses publicly available information on issues such as forced labor, protecting human-rights activists and the living wage to score companies on a percentage scale. Two-thirds of companies scored less than 30% overall, the study found, with the average company at 27%. In the last edition of the index, released in 2017, the average score was 18%....

...Of the 101 companies surveyed, 40% of them failed to show any evidence of identifying or mitigating human-rights issues in their supply chains. Virtually none demonstrated strong commitments to paying living wages to workers along the supply chain or in their own operations, the study found.

 

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Article
12 November 2018

Corporate Human Rights Benchmark Key Findings Report 2018

Author: Corporate Human Rights Benchmark

Since its inception, the CHRB has been aiming to answer a deceptively simple question; which companies perform best on human rights issues? [...] [T]his document [...] rank[s] 101 of the world’s largest companies in high human-rights-risk sectors and provides a snapshot of their human rights performance. The overall picture is deeply concerning; most companies score poorly on the Benchmark, indicating weak implementation of the UN Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights... A quarter of companies score less than 10% [...] and an alarming amount of companies score no points for human rights due diligence. This should provide food for thought for governments considering the role of legislation in business and human rights... But there are positive signs as well. Better scoring companies are a minority, but they do exist. They demonstrate that integrating respect for human rights is neither impossible, nor detrimental, to the business model. They also show more willingness to discuss policies-in-action and the challenges they face... The CHRB recognises that implementing respect for human rights is a journey and we have been pleased to see significant score improvements from companies... This Key Findings Report [...] provide[s] [...] a high-level assessment of the maturity of corporate respect for human rights...

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Article
12 November 2018

Prada, Starbucks and Kraft censured over human rights transparency

Author: Financial Times

Prada, Starbucks and Kraft Heinz are among companies criticised for a lack of transparency on human rights in their businesses and supply chains, despite pressure from governments and an investor-backed group.

Forty percent of companies fail to show any evidence of how they identify and address human rights issues, according to the Corporate Human Rights Benchmark, a not-for-profit group based in London. The CHRB released its second annual ranking of 101 global companies today.

The body is backed by asset managers including Aviva Investors, APG and Nordea, as well as the Swiss, Dutch and British governments, and uses the UN guiding principles on business and human rights...

Those that performed well in the ranking included miner Rio Tinto, Marks and Spencer, the UK retailer, and consumer goods giant Unilever, with scores of at least 65 per cent. Adidas was top performer with 87 per cent...

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Author: Corporate Human Rights Benchmark

自企业人权基准启动以来,该评分体系旨在回答一个貌似简单的问题:哪些公司在人权领域表现最好?…本报告…对全球最大的101家公司在人权高危行业的表现进行评分,让公众对这些公司的人权绩效有一个大致的了解。整体情况让人深感担忧,多数公司的评分较低,这意味着《联合国工商企业与人权指导原则》的落实不到位…四分之一的公司评分低于10分(以百分制为基础)…许多公司在人权尽责方面的评分为零。这为政府考虑工商企业与人权领域立法的作用提供了借鉴…评分也反映出一些积极信号。虽然得分高的公司是少数,但毕竟还是有这样的公司。他们的表现证明,在商业模式中融入对人权的尊重是可行且无害的。这些公司也更愿意去讨论如何将政策转化为行动以及面临的相关挑战…企业人权基准的报告结果发现,落实尊重人权是一条漫长的道路,但我们很高兴看到公司的评分有所提高…报告就企业尊重人权的程度进行高级别的评估…

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Author: Corporate Human Rights Benchmark

自企業人權基準啟動以來,該評分體系旨在回答一個貌似簡單的問題:哪些公司在人權領域表現最好? …本報告…對全球最大的101家公司在人權高危行業的表現進行評分,讓公眾對這些公司的人權績效有一個大致的了解。整體情況讓人深感擔憂,多數公司的評分較低,這意味著《聯合國工商企業與人權指導原則》的落實不到位…四分之一的公司評分低於10分(以百分制為基礎)…許多公司在人權盡責方面的評分為零。這為政府考慮工商企業與人權領域立法的作用提供了借鑒…評分也反映出一些積極信號。雖然得分高的公司是少數,但畢竟還是有這樣的公司。他們的表現證明,在商業模式中融入對人權的尊重是可行且無害的。這些公司也更願意去討論如何將政策轉化為行動以及面臨的相關挑戰…企業人權基準的報告結果發現,落實尊重人權是一條漫長的道路,但我們很高興看到公司的評分有所提高…報告就企業尊重人權的程度進行高級別的評估…

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