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Guardian investigation: "Revealed: Qatar's World Cup 'slaves' - Exclusive: Abuse and exploitation of migrant workers preparing emirate for 2022"

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Author: Céline Schoen avec Loïc de La Mornais, Géopolis

« Les forçats immigrés de la Coupe du Monde au Qatar... pas payés depuis un an ! », 29 juillet 2014

…[L]a presse britannique révèle que les travailleurs migrants qui construisent les futurs stades et bureaux [pour le Mondial 2022 au Qatar] n'auraient pas été payés depuis plus d'un an…Les plaintes déposées auprès des autorités qataries n'y ont rien changé…Les conditions de travail…[des] migrants…sont déplorables : ils partagent des chambres à sept, dorment sur des matelas sales et fins, à même le sol. Leur sort est même contraire au droit du travail en vigueur dans l'émirat…Les migrants vivent dans la peur constante, car leur employeur, Lee Trading, a fait faillite…[et] ils n'ont légalement pas le droit de travailler pour une autre entreprise…

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27 July 2014

Qatar: World Cup migrant workers wait a year to be paid for building offices

Author: Robert Booth, and Pete Pattisson, the Gaurdian (UK)

Migrant workers who built luxury offices used by Qatar's 2022 football World Cup organisers have told the Guardian they have not been paid for more than a year and are now working illegally from cockroach-infested lodgings. Officials in Qatar's Supreme Committee for Delivery and Legacy have been using offices on the 38th and 39th floors of Doha's landmark al-Bidda skyscraper – known as the Tower of Football – which were fitted out by men from Nepal, Sri Lanka and India who say they have not been paid for up to 13 months' work. The project, a Guardian investigation shows, was directly commissioned by the Qatar government and the workers' plight is set to raise fresh doubts over the autocratic emirate's commitment to labour rights as construction starts this year on five new stadiums for the World Cup... Their case was raised with Qatar's prime minister by Amnesty International last November, but the workers have said 13 of them remain stranded in Qatar... Contracts show the project was commissioned by Katara Projects, a Qatar government organisation under the auspices of the office of the then heir apparent, Sheikh Tamim bin Hamad al-Thani, who is now the emir...Katara said it terminated its agreement with Lee Trading when it discovered the mistreatment of workers and non-payment of wages, and made efforts to repatriate those affected or find them new jobs.

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Article
1 October 2013

Qatar response to labour rights violations weak and disappointing

Author: ITUC

Sharan Burrow, General Secretary of the International Trade Union Confederation, said the promise by the Qatar authorities simply to increase the number of labour inspectors is weak and disappointing. “There are already labour inspectors and they have no impact. What is needed are laws that protect workers’ rights to join a union, bargain collectively and refuse unsafe work, and only then can inspectors do their job.

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Article
1 October 2013

Qatar World Cup 2022: 70 Nepalese workers die on building sites

Author: Robert Booth, Guardian (UK)

Seventy Nepalese builders working in Qatar in the runup to the 2022 football World Cup have died on construction sites since the start of 2012. Fifteen have died this year, according to a death toll announced by Nepal government representatives in Doha...The death toll was released at a joint press conference held by the governments of Nepal and Qatar, at which they denied Guardian reports about brutal working conditions, long hours, lack of food and pay and squalid living quarters facing Nepalese workers...

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Article
30 September 2013

Qatar promises crackdown over deaths of World Cup construction workers

Author: Martin Chulov and Robert Booth, Guardian (UK)

Qatar has promised to crack down on private building companies who exploit migrant workers, following a Guardian investigation that revealed alarming numbers of labourers are dying in the building boom prior to the 2022 World Cup. Qatari labour minister Saleh al-Khulaifi said the Gulf state would recruit more inspectors to mount raids and checks on companies to ensure they comply with labour laws and hire more interpreters to speed up the treatment of complaints from foreign workers...The International Trade Union Confederation said the promised raids and checks did nothing to abolish the Qatari system which strips migrant workers of their passports, renders them powerless to complain about conditions, and traps them in Qatar, unable to leave.

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Article
27 September 2013

'Modern-day slavery' in Qatar: there's bad and good news

Author: Nicholas McGeehan, Gulf Researcher, Human Rights Watch

...This issue requires bold leadership right from the top. Sheikh Tamim, Qatar's new emir, has much to gain from taking a strong line on labour rights and empowering Qatar's reformers to take the steps required to end forced labour in the country. You don't need a crystal ball to figure out what will happen if he doesn't.

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Article
26 September 2013

Mistreatment of Nepali workers in Qatar goes way beyond the World Cup

Author: Adam Pasick, Quartz

...Even before work began for the World Cup...ties between Nepal, one of the world’s poorest countries, and Qatar, one of the richest, were strained because of the way Nepali workers were being mistreated. In July the two countries signed an agreement designed to crack down on Qatari companies that force Nepalis to work without pay after confiscating their passports and identity cards. There are nearly 100,000 Nepalis working in Qatar, mostly as construction workers and housemaids...

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Article
25 September 2013

Qatar World Cup 'slaves': the official response

Author: Mona Mahmood, Guardian (UK)

The company behind the Lusail City development, Qatar's 2022 World Cup organising committee and the labour ministry respond to allegations of worker exploitation.

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Article
25 September 2013

Revealed: Qatar's World Cup 'slaves' - Exclusive: Abuse and exploitation of migrant workers preparing emirate for 2022

Author: Pete Pattisson, Guardian (UK)

Dozens of Nepalese migrant labourers have died in Qatar in recent weeks and thousands more are enduring appalling labour abuses, a Guardian investigation has found, raising serious questions about Qatar's preparations to host the 2022 World Cup...

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