hide message

Welcome to the Resource Centre

We make it our mission to work with advocates in civil society, business and government to address inequalities of power, seek remedy for abuse, and ensure protection of people and planet.

Both companies and impacted communities thank us for the resources and support we provide.

This is only possible because of your support. Please make a donation today.

Thank you,
Phil Bloomer, Executive Director

Donate now hide message

India: Follow-up report on exploitation of child workers and Dalit children exposes lack of action by intl. clothing brands

Get RSS feed of these results

All components of this story

Company non-response
22 August 2012

Next did not respond to: Tesco responds to report about lack of action by intl. clothing brands on exploitation of child workers & Dalit children.

Article
20 August 2012

[DOC] Tesco response re allegations of child labour in supply chain in India

Author: Tesco

Child labour is an issue that Tesco takes very seriously. As a founder member and signatory of the Ethical Trading Initiative (ETI), we expect our suppliers to comply with the requirements of the ETI ‘Base Code’. Through ‘Trading Fairly’, our ethical trading programme, we monitor our suppliers' compliance, support them where they need to improve, and discontinue business where they fail to demonstrate the necessary commitment or progress.

Read the full post here

Company response
15 August 2012

Response by Tesco: Follow-up report on exploitation of child workers and Dalit children exposes lack of action by intl. clothing brands.

Read the full post here

Company response
7 August 2012

Diesel response

Author: Diesel

Diesel requests all its suppliers to sign its Code of Conduct, which commits them legally to treat each employee with dignity and respect, and not to use corporal punishment, threats, verbal harassment, abuses or any other form of physical, sexual or psychological violence…The suppliers are obliged to sign the Code, and if found in default will see their business and partnership with Diesel interrupted immediately…The Supplier agrees not to employ persons younger than the legal minimum age required by the law in force in the Country where the manufacturing facilities are located, and anyway child labour, and in any case not to assign underage employees to dangerous works, unhealthy or incompatible with the compulsory education.

Read the full post here

Company response
7 August 2012

Inditex response

Author: Inditex

…Inditex has clearly answered that none of its suppliers (including those working for Pull&Bear brand) neither work nor accept the Sumangali scheme. Inditex has confirmed the veracity of this fact and is actively working in this sense together with other Indian manufacturers through our partnership with the Ethical Trading Initiative (ETI).

Read the full post here

Company response
7 August 2012

Quicksilver response

Author: Quicksilver

Read the full post here

Company response
3 August 2012

Eastman response regarding child labour employed in its factories in India

Author: Eastman

…we have no Child labour in any of our production units…We have a thorough and a strict control and verification of all age related documents…We do not have any schemes such as Sumangali or any other labour binding schemes in any name or form in any factory…Minimum wages is strictly as per the labour laws. Overtime is paid double the wages…we do not run any hostel facility for any of our workers in any production centre…All our labour practices are open, transparent, accountable and verifiable…Social audits run in our factories full year by several globally reputed professional audit agencies.

Read the full post here

Company response
3 August 2012

Mothercare response

Author: Mothercare

Mothercare has a strong track record, over many years, of acting responsibly to tackle ethical trading issues and achieve better outcomes for workers…also an active member of the local Tirupur Stakeholders’ Forum (TSF), which was set up directly to tackle the issue of Sumangali Schemes and includes representatives from brands, local NGOs, trade unions and suppliers…Mothercare Responsible Sourcing Team is working with a number of our South India suppliers to investigate any issues that may be present at their factories and mills. Also, we continue to work with local experts and NGOs to understand and tackle the root causes of common issues that are faced by factories in this region.

Read the full post here

Company response
1 August 2012

Marks & Spencer response to SOMO update

Author: Marks & Spencer

We conducted our own investigations into the M&S suppliers named in the SOMO report ‘Captured by Cotton’ and found no evidence to support the claims. We are therefore very confident that there are no cases of ‘Sumangali’ at any of our garment factories in India. ..We take any allegation of a breach of our strict ethical standards very seriously. We do not tolerate abuse of these standards and where we do find problems, we work closely with our suppliers and their workers to put things right.

Read the full post here

Article
1 July 2012

[PDF] Bonded (child) labour in the South Indian Garment Industry: An Update of Debate and Action on the ‘Sumangali Scheme’

Author: SOMO / India Committee of the Netherlands

…[T]he Centre for Research on Multinational Corporations (SOMO) and the India Committee of the Netherlands (ICN)… published two major reports [‘Captured by Cotton’, 2011 and ‘Maid in India’, 2012] documenting the exploitation of Dalit girls in the South Indian garment industry that produces for European and US markets. This update zooms in on on-going abuses in the Tamil Nadu garment industry, as well as on the debate and actions to tackle the ‘Sumangali Scheme’ [bonded labour], that is fuelled by the findings and recommendations of the SOMO and ICN reports…Pressure from active brands on their suppliers has brought about some improvements in employment and labour conditions on the work floor and in workers hostels, but major labour abuses continue to occur…[and] public concern about these violations is growing.…[T]he majority of the brands…have not taken any action so far… [refers to Primark, Inditex (Zara, Pull and Bear, and other brands), Tesco, C&A, Diesel, Marks & Spencer, Ralph Lauren, Quicksilver, Cristal Martin (suppliers to Mothercare, Next), American Eagle Outfitters and Philips-Van Heusen (Tommy Hilfiger and Calvin Klein)]. [Business & Human Rights Resource Centre invited the companies against which allegations were raised to respond. Diesel, Eastman, Inditex, Marks & Spencer, Mothercare, Quicksilver and Tesco responses are below. Next declined to respond. Ralph Lauren did not respond].

Read the full post here