hide message

Welcome to the Resource Centre

We make it our mission to work with advocates in civil society, business and government to address inequalities of power, seek remedy for abuse, and ensure protection of people and planet.

Both companies and impacted communities thank us for the resources and support we provide.

This is only possible because of your support. Please make a donation today.

Thank you,
Phil Bloomer, Executive Director

Donate now hide message

Institute for Human Rights and Business releases briefings on forced labour & recruitment fees

On 4 May 2016 the Institute for Human Rights and Business launched two briefings on Forced Labour and Recruitment Fees.

Briefing: Recruitment Fees

Get RSS feed of these results

All components of this story

Report
4 May 2016

Briefing: Forced Labour

Author: Institute for Human Rights and Business

The global nature of modern business has seen increased fluidity of capital and labour around the world. Inherent to this is the ubiquitous occurence of trafficking and forced labour in what many might consider to be modern economies, with exploitation being found across both the global north and south. The ILO estimates there are 21 million people around the world trapped in forced labour, generating $150 billion per year.

This IHRB Briefing provides an overview of the human rights risks posed by trafficking and forced labour. It includes information on: indicators of forced labour; how company practices increase the liklihood of trafficking and forced labour; key international standards; helpful resources; and more.

Read the full post here

Report
4 May 2016

Briefing: Recruitment Fees

Author: Institute for Human Rights and Business

Migrant workers are a ubiquitous feature of the global economy – the International Labour Organization estimates there are 150 million migrants in the global workforce. 

These workers – and in particular low-skilled migrants – are often among the most vulnerable to exploitation and frequently less able to understand, defend or promote their rights. In the labour market migrant workers can suffer job discrimination, unfair treatment, unequal wages, harsh working conditions and other affronts to their basic dignity. 

The situations low-skilled migrant workers face are often made worse by excessive debt. This debt is incurred through high recruitment fees they must pay to secure the work. 

This IHRB Briefing provides an overview of the human rights risks posed to migrant workers due to the practice of charging them fees as part of the recruitment process. It includes information on: what are recruitment fees; the impact of recruitment fees; the business case for ethical recruitment; what businesses should do; key resources; and more.

Read the full post here