Japan: Workers work up to or beyond "karoshi line" in most Japanese manufacturers

salarymen on train credit_alamy

An umbrella organisations of labour unions in the manufacturing industries has published a study showing that the agreements between management and the labour unions of manjor manufacturers all allow for overtime at least up to the officialy recognised "karoshi line" of 80 hours overtime per month, and many provide for overtime far beyond that limit. For example, the agreement at IHI reportedly allows for workers to perform up to 200 hours of overtime per month, Hitachi up to 150, and Sumitomo Heavy Industries up to 140. Toshiba allows 120, Mitsubishi Electrics 105, and  Fujitsu, JFE Steel, and Mitsui Engineering and Shipbuilding all allow 100 hours of overtime per month. Toyota, Mazda, Nissan, Mitsubishi Motors, Kawasaki Heavy Industries, NEC, and Nippon Steel and Sumitomo Metal all allow for up to 80 hours of overtime. 

Government guidelines state that workers should not perform more than 45 hours of overtime per month: however, these guidelines are not binding. Japanese labour law allows for unions (most of which are company based) to enter into agreements with management regarding the maximum amount of overtime to be allowed, and the agreements in many companies go beyond the government recognised "karoshi line".  Several high profile cases of death from overwork have led to the goverment starting preparation of a bill that would prohibit overtime beyond a specified limit: however, reports indicate that this bill may stipulate a limit beyond the "karoshi line".

 

Get RSS feed of these results

All components of this story

Article
+ 日本語 - Hide

Author: しんぶん赤旗

労働時間の上限規制が焦点となっているなか、自動車や電機、鉄鋼、造船などの大企業の2015年の労働時間が年間2000時間前後となっていることが分かりました。

製造業大手の組合が加盟する全日本金属産業労働組合協議会(金属労協、JCM)がまとめたもの。残業時間の上限を労使で取り決める「三六(さぶろく)協定」特別条項で、「過労死ライン」とされる月80時間を超える職場が多数にのぼっていることが背景にあります。

多くの大企業で平均総実労働時間が1900時間を上回り、2000時間を超過するところも見られます。実際には2000時間を大きく上回る労働者もいるとみられます。厚労省はパート労働者を含めて年間1800時間への時短を達成したとしていますが、大企業でも程遠いのが実態です。

Read the full post here