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Jordan: UNHCR compact 1 year on - challenges for access to school & work for Syrian refugees remain

Author: United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees, Published on: 23 February 2017

"UNHCR consultations with refugees – The Jordan Compact, one year later, Understanding main challenges, analysis of the group discussions", 29 Jan 2017

...consultations with refugee leaders and active members of the CSCs (Community Support Committees) were organized by UNHCR Amman to discuss education and livelihoods over the last year, priorities in the Jordan compact...The difficult economic situation of families was mentioned by all groups as main obstacle to school attendance; the distance of school and lack of transport...Lack of documentation prevents access to school...Refugee community leaders discussed the lack of information about available jobs. There are no opportunities for well-educated refugees, nor possibility to regularize jobs in higher professions (doctors and other professionals). The fact that work permits are attached to a job/contract is not conducive for daily/seasonal jobs (in which many refugees are engaged) and discourages formalization; minimum salary jobs (190 JDs) and long working days are not attractive as it does not leave time for occasional (daily or seasonal) jobs. In addition, it is difficult to change job, especially for those who work in factories, as a new job requires to start the work permit procedure all over again...All groups asked for flexible solutions that would give more opportunities to work – rather than limiting opportunities for regularized work - both in terms of types of occupation as well as in terms of allowing freelance, self-employed work. Work permits should not be tied to an employer but rather to the person, based on certifiable skills... All groups asked for flexible solutions that would give more opportunities to work – rather than limiting opportunities for regularized work - both in terms of types of occupation as well as in terms of allowing freelance, self-employed work. Work permits should not be tied to an employer but rather to the person, based on certifiable skills...

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