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[PDF] Enhancing Corporate Accountability for Human Rights Violations: Is Extraterritoriality the Magic Potion?

The United Nations Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights…largely depend on state action and corporate good will for their implementation. One…way for states to prevent and redress violations of human rights committed by companies outside their country of registration is to adopt measures with extraterritorial implications…or to assert direct extraterritorial jurisdiction in specific instances. Some United Nations human rights bodies and non-governmental organisations are clearly supporting the use of extraterritoriality and have argued that international human rights law places an obligation on states to embrace extraterritoriality so as to better control the activities of companies registered on their territories…[This] article aims to determine whether extraterritoriality is the magic potion that will help enhance corporate accountability for human rights violations committed overseas. The article explores whether such obligation exists and, beyond this, whether extraterritoriality should be further encouraged.

Part of the following stories

Shell lawsuit (re Nigeria - Kiobel & Wiwa)

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