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Report

The work of the future: Building better jobs in an age of intelligent machines

... As this report documents, the labor market impacts of technologies like AI and robotics are taking years to unfold. But we have no time to spare in preparing for them. If those technologies deploy into the labor institutions of today, which were designed for the last century, we will see similar effects to recent decades: downward pressure on wages, skills, and benefits, and an increasingly bifurcated labor market... [We] suggest a better alternative: building a future for work that harvests the dividends of rapidly advancing automation and ever-more powerful computers to deliver opportunity and economic security for workers. To channel the rising productivity stemming from technological innovations into broadly shared gains, we must foster institutional innovations that complement technological change.

Following two years of study, data collection, and analysis, the Task Force draws the following conclusions:

  1. Technological change is simultaneously replacing existing work and creating new work. It is not eliminating work altogether....
  2. Momentous impacts of technological change are unfolding gradually...
  3. Rising labor productivity has not translated into broad increases in incomes because labor market institutions and policies have fallen into disrepair...
  4. Improving the quality of jobs requires innovation in labor market institutions...
  5. Fostering opportunity and economic mobility necessitates cultivating and refreshing worker skills...
  6. Investing in innovation will drive new job creation, speed growth, and meet rising competitive challenges...