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Article

27 Mar 2020

Author:
Sin Embargo

[Unofficial summary] Mexico: Concerns for the health & safety of factory workers allegedly forced to continue working

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Unofficial summary translation by Business & Human Rights Resource Centre of the original Spanish article:

"Over 2,000 workers and their families from Mayan communities are at risk because the Germany factory LEONI has forced them to continue operating, despite having registered at least 4 cases of Coronavirus in the plant in Yucatán… 

An example of savage capitalism is being lived through by Mayan communities in this pandemic.  The Germany factory LEONI Wiring Systems, that makes components for the car industry, is not stopping operations despite having four cases confirmed of workers with COVID-19.  The rest of the workers, some with diabetes and hypertension, fear contracting the disease in a work space without social distance and in contact with the same produced object, as they live in areas without adequate health or drainage services. 

The only measure announced on Thursday was to suspend the informative meetings for contractors.  In contrast, other big German car producers such as Volkswagen and BMW decided to suspend their plants in Mexico and other countries…"

Part of the following timelines

Mexico: LEONI factory workers allegedly forced to continue working despite COVID-19 outbreak; incl. company response

Impacts of COVID-19 on supply chain workers in the electronics sector