"Making a Killing: The Business of War" (11-part series by Intl. Consortium of Investigative Journalists)

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Article
20 November 2002

Making a Killing: The Business of War [11-part series]

Author: Center for Public Integrity’s International Consortium of Investigative Journalists

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Article
13 November 2002

chapter 8 of "Making a Killing: The Business of War": The Influence Peddlers

Author: Yossi Melman & Julio Godoy, Center for Public Integrity

[Arcadi Gaydamak, arms trafficking, Angola]

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Article
11 November 2002

chapter 7 of "Making a Killing: The Business of War": The Adventure Capitalist

Author: Mungo Soggot & Phillip van Niekerk, Center for Public Integrity

[Niko Shefer] [refers to South Africa, Liberia, Democratic Republic of Congo, Zimbabwe, mining industry, diamond industry, arms industry]

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Article
8 November 2002

chapter 6 of "Making a Killing: The Business of War": Conflict Diamonds are Forever

Author: Mungo Suggot, Center for Public Integrity

[refers to De Beers, Kimberley Diamond Exchange, De Decker Diamonds]

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Article
6 November 2002

chapter 5 of "Making a Killing: The Business of War": The Curious Bonds of Oil Diplomacy [Equatorial Guinea]

Author: Sunday Dare, Center for Public Integrity

...The 23-year-old regime of President Teodoro Obiang Nguema Mbasogo has been criticized for allowing the oil companies to exploit Equatorial Guinea’s oil riches with little obvious benefit to the people. [includes reference to ExxonMobil, Amerada Hess, Chevron Texaco and Marathon Oil]

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Article
4 November 2002

chapter 4 of "Making a Killing: The Business of War": Greasing the Skids of Corruption

Author: Phillip van Niekerk & Laura Peterson, Center for Public Integrity

[refers to money paid by multinational oil companies to Angolan Government ending up in private bank accounts] [includes reference to Marathon Oil Company]...Angola is certainly not unique as a country where conflict and corruption are fueled by petroleum dollars [includes reference to Chinese, Canadian and Malaysian oil companies in Sudan; Shell in Nigeria; Equatorial Guinea]...Some oil companies contribute to the problem directly by hiring corrupt government militaries to provide security for their operations. [includes reference to ExxonMobil in Indonesia, Unocal and Total in Burma]

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Article
30 October 2002

chapter 3 of "Making a Killing: The Business of War": Marketing the New 'Dogs of War'

Author: Duncan Campbell, Center for Public Integrity

[private military companies] [includes reference to Executive Outcomes/Sandline International, Strategic Consulting International (SCI) Ltd., Sandline Consultancy Ltd, Trident Maritime]

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Article
28 October 2002

chapter 1 of "Making a Killing: The Business of War": Introduction: Making a Killing: The Business of War

Author: Philip van Niekerk, Center for Public Integrity

...Gone is the superpower ideological divide that once gave a strange sort of order to the world’s wars. In its place are entrepreneurs, selling arms or military expertise and support, and companies, whose drilling and mining in some of the hottest spots often prolong conflict and instability.

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Article
28 October 2002

chapter 2 of "Making a Killing: The Business of War": Privatizing Combat, the New World Order

Author: Laura Peterson, Center for Public Integrity

...ICI is one of several companies contracted by the State Department to go into danger zones that are too risky or unsavory to commit conventional U.S. forces. It also has been active in conflicts in Haiti and Liberia [in addition to Sierra Leone]...a nearly two-year investigation by ICIJ [International Consortium of Investigative Journalists] identified at least 90 private military companies, or PMCs (as some of these new millennium mercenaries prefer to be known), that have operated in 110 countries worldwide. [includes reference to Kellogg Brown & Root, a subsidiary of Halliburton; Booz Allen Hamilton; BDM, owned by the Carlyle Group; Armor Holdings; L-3 Communications; MPRI; Sayeret Group; Pistris Inc.; Trojan Securities; TASK International; DynCorp; ICI]

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