Maritime Industry and Human Rights: Shipbreaking

Naquib Hossain (cc-by-2.0)

Shipbreaking is one the world's most dirty and dangerous industries. The vast majority of world's end-of-life ships are broken down - by hand - on the shores of South Asia.

On the one hand, workers, often exploited migrants, suffer loss of life, accidents, and occupational diseases due to unsafe working conditions and exposure to toxic fumes and materials. On the other hand, coastal ecosystems and the local communities depending on them are devastated by toxic spills and other types of pollution from breaking vessels on beaches. As such, the negative consequences of shipbreaking are real and felt by many.

Safer and cleaner methods of ship recycling already exist but until the global community shows leadership and forces toxic ships off the beach, the shipping and shipbreaking industries will continue their race to the bottom.

Get RSS feed of these results

Related stories and components

Article
30 July 2018

Study by Human Rights at Sea & University of Bristol highlights human rights abuses at sea, and the challenges in monitoring & reporting them

"HRAS & University of Bristol Publish ‘Flag States and Human Rights’ Report", 24 July 2018...

Read more

Article
23 January 2019

Dutch ship-owner fined for beaching ship in India under conditions causing damage to environment & health

Author: Hellenic Shipping News

"Another Dutch ship owner faces huge fine for having beached a vessel", 21 January 2019...

Read more

Article
6 February 2019
+ Deutsch - Hide

Author: Public Eye

"Wo Schiffe sich zum Sterben verstecken", Januar 2019...

Read more

Article
6 February 2019

Shipping industry exploits loopholes in intl. law to break up ships in South Asia under dangerous conditions for workers & environment, finds report

Author: Public Eye

"Where ships go to die", January 2019...

Read more