NGOs, academics, and politicians condemn plans to prosecute source that exposed Luxembourg tax deals

RL/Liberation

A group of NGOs, academics and politicians, including Business & Human Rights Resource Centre, have written an open letter to prosecutors in Luxembourg calling on them to abandon plans to prosecute Antoine Deltour, the whistleblower who leaked documents that exposed tax rulings secured by PricewaterhouseCoopers in Luxembourg that allow aggressive tax avoidance by business. Deltour faces criminal prosecutions for theft, violating professional secrecy, exposing trade secrets, and illegally accessing a database.

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Article
24 December 2014

Open Letter

Author: Politicians, academics, unions, and NGOs in The Guardian

We deplore the decision by Luxembourg to bring criminal charges against someone they believe to be the whistleblower responsible for passing to the media confidential rulings awarded by the Luxembourg tax authorities... We believe these disclosures were manifestly in the public interest, helping to expose the industrial scale on which Luxembourg has sanctioned aggressive tax-avoidance schemes, draining huge sums from public coffers beyond its borders... While we understand and agree the rule of law must be observed, we note that Luxembourg prosecutors are required to have in mind whether or not the public interest is served by pursuing a criminal prosecution. We believe there is no public interest in prosecuting an individual suspected of bringing the LuxLeaks papers to the attention of the world.

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Article
24 December 2014

World unites to decry prosecution of source behind LuxLeaks tax scandal

Author: Simon Bowers, The Guardian

More than 70 politicians, academics, union heads and charity leaders around the world have come out in opposition to the decision by Luxembourg to prosecute the 28-year-old accountant accused of sparking the LuxLeaks tax scandal... In an open letter to prosecutors in the Grand Duchy, critics of the decision to prosecute Deltour argued that the leak had been “manifestly in the public interest, helping to expose the industrial scale on which Luxembourg has sanctioned aggressive tax avoidance schemes, draining huge sums from public coffers beyond its borders”.. The charges stem from an official complaint brought by [PricewaterhouseCoopers]. He could face jail and a heavy fine.

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Article
5 November 2014

Luxembourg tax files: how tiny state rubber-stamped tax avoidance on an industrial scale

Author: Simon Bowers, The Guardian

A cache of almost 28,000 pages of leaked tax agreements, returns and other sensitive papers relating to over 1,000 businesses paints a damning picture of an EU state which is quietly rubber-stamping tax avoidance on an industrial scale.... The documents show that major companies... have used complex webs of internal loans and interest payments which have slashed the companies’ tax bills... The documents also show how some 340 companies from around the world arranged specially-designed corporate structures with the Luxembourg authorities.

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