hide message

Welcome to the Resource Centre

We make it our mission to work with advocates in civil society, business and government to address inequalities of power, seek remedy for abuse, and ensure protection of people and planet.

Both companies and impacted communities thank us for the resources and support we provide.

This is only possible because of your support. Please make a donation today.

Thank you,
Phil Bloomer, Executive Director

Donate now hide message

Progress made in Unilever’s labour practices in Vietnam, but significant challenges remain, says Oxfam

Get RSS feed of these results

All components of this story

Report
5 July 2016

Labour rights in Vietnam: Unilever’s progress and systemic challenges

Author: Oxfam

Oxfam has reviewed the progress made by multinational Unilever since its 2011 study into the gap between the company’s high-level policies on labour rights and the reality on the ground for workers, with a focus on the case of Vietnam. The review found that the company’s overall commitment to respecting human and labour rights has been strengthened as a result of effective leadership across the business. However, some critical implementation challenges remain that will require a systemic approach and effort to address.

Read the full post here

Article
5 July 2016

Progress made in Unilever’s labour practices in Vietnam, but significant challenges remain, says Oxfam

Author: Fiona Briggs in Ethical Sourcing, Sustainability Time

new report published today by Oxfam finds Unilever’s overall commitment to labour rights in its Vietnam supply chain has improved over the last three years, but that significant challenges remain. The report follows a previous study in 2013 which highlighted the gap between the company’s policies and the reality on the ground for workers of precarious work, low wages and excessive working hours, which Oxfam says are endemic in global supply chains like these...Evidence of Unilever’s improved commitment to labour rights includes regular dialogue with trade unions at a global level, better sourcing policies, increased trust between workers and management and a commitment to more direct employment in its manufacturing operations, bringing greater job security and employment benefits. However, the review also showed there is a lot more to be done to achieve sustained positive change for workers making its products in Vietnam and other parts of its supply chain, something the company acknowledges.

Read the full post here