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Report evaluates jewelers progress in promoting socially and environmentally responsible mining – 60 firms endorse principles for ethical sourcing

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Article
10 February 2010

Leading Jewelry Retailers Act on Pledge To Shun Dirty Gold

Author: Earthworks

A report released today by the Washington, DC-based environmental group Earthworks…evaluates progress jewelers have made in pursuit of cleaner sources of precious metals…Jewelry companies…[are] endorsing the Golden Rules, a set of principles for more responsible mining…urging the mining industry to end practices that harm local communities, pollute drinking water, and generate millions of tons of toxic waste...Target, T.J. Maxx, and Harry Winston are among the retailers who…have repeatedly declined…supporting the Golden Rules…[The report] includes a scorecard to assess how signatories of the Golden Rules are complying with its requirements…Birks & Mayors…Tiffany & Co., and…Herff Jones reported making the most progress . Smaller jewelers reported making the largest strides…including…Brilliant Earth, London's Cred Jewellry, Lena Marie Chelle Designs, and Real Jewels. [also refers to Sears]

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Article
10 February 2010

[PDF] Tarnished Gold: Assessing the jewelry industry’s progress on ethical sourcing of metals

Author: Earthworks

This report is an evaluation of the efforts made by jewelers towards responsible sourcing of precious metals. It is based on responses to a survey sent to the jewelers that had signed on to the Golden Rules by mid-February 2009 and to other large jewelry retailers who sold jewelry worth more than $100 million…Based on their self-reporting to the No Dirty Gold campaign, these jewelers were graded in terms of progress made towards sourcing precious metals more responsibly. In general, smaller jewelers scored higher on a number of indicators [refers to Alberto Parada, Amazon.com, Anglo American, April Doubleday, Ben Bridge Jeweler, Bidz.com, Birks & Mayors, Blue Nile, Boscov’s, Boucheron (part of PPR), Brilliant Earth, Carlyle, Cartier (part of Richemont), Commemorative Brands (part of American Achievement), Costco, Cred Jewellery, Fair Trade in Gems and Jewelry, Fey & co. Jewelers, Fifi Bijoux, Finlay, Fred Meyer and Littman (part of Kroger), Gitanjali, Goldenwest, Hacker, Hannoush, Harry Winston (part of Aber Diamond), Helzberg Diamonds (part of Berkshire Hathaway), Henrich & Denzel, Herff Jones, Ingle & Rhode, Intergold, JCPenney, Jostens, Kohl’s, Leber Jeweler, Lena Marie Echelle Designs, Macy’s, Meijer, Michaels Jewelers, Mike Angenent/Open Source Minerals, Nature’s Candy Designs, Neiman Marcus, Piage (part of Richemont), QVC (part of Liberty Media), Real Jewels, Reeds Jewelers, Reflective Images, Robbins Bros, Rogers Enterprises, Ross-Simons, Saks, Sears, Security Jewelers, Signet, Stephen Fortner, T.J. Maxx (part of TJX), Target, Tiffany, Toby Pomeroy, Tourneau, Ultra Stores, Van Cleef & Arpels (part of Richemont), Van Gundy, Wal-Mart, Zale]

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