Report & guidance on cos. best practice to protect migrant workers in recruitment & supply chains

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Article
14 August 2017

Shareholder campaign to eradicate forced labour yields multiple corporate commitments

Author: Interfaith Center on Corporate Responsibility (ICCR)

Members of the Interfaith Center on Corporate Responsibility (ICCR), a coalition of faith and values investors...announced [on 9 August 2017] breakthroughs with five companies they have been engaging to promote ethical labor recruitment policies throughout their global supply chains. The labor recruitment process, particularly the recruitment of migrant workers across borders, has proven to be a significant risk factor for forced labor and other workplace human rights violations. Cross-border job seekers may be charged high fees and asked to surrender travel documents by unethical labor brokers who then entrap them in bonded labor, a form of modern-day slavery. ICCR’s “No Fees” initiative aims to drive the adoption of company policies which specifically stipulate that employees never pay recruitment fees for jobs, have a clear written contract, and do not lose access to their identity documents. Changes to supplier codes were announced by Ford, General Motors, Hormel Foods, Marriott Hotels and Michael Kors, all of which committed to adopt public-facing “no fees” recruitment policies throughout their supply chains. The companies represent several sectors considered at high risk for unethical recruitment practices including food / agriculture, hospitality, apparel, and automotive… Valentina Gurney, who leads the [ICCR’s] “No Fees” initiative [said] “Brands are waking up to the fact that controlling labor recruitment at all levels of the supply chain is a corporate responsibility. With these new commitments, we see real momentum building and we congratulate these five companies for stepping out on this important issue.”...

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Article
8 August 2017

Best Practice Guidance on Ethical Recruitment of Migrant Workers

Author: Interfaith Center on Corporate Responsibility (ICCR)

...The purpose of ICCR’s Best Practice Guidance on Ethical Recruitment of Migrant Workers is to highlight the steps some leading companies have made that may serve as examples or models for other companies looking to implement ethical recruitment policies, and drive change at the recruitment agency level. By examining eight companies in high risk sectors, ICCR provides an analysis of emerging best practices in the development of corporate ethical recruitment policies and identifies gaps where improvement is needed. We hope this analysis will serve companies, suppliers, workers and the investment community. Several of these case studies are based on ICCR member engagements. Additional case studies are the result of research furnished by Social Accountability International (SAI).

The eight companies participating in case studies represent an array of industries from food and beverage, to apparel, electronics, and agriculture, and are located in the Asia- Pacific region (India, Thailand, Malaysia, Taiwan), Africa and the United States. [Includes Coca-Cola, CP Foods, Hewlett Packard, Patagonia, Penguin Apparel, Princes Tuna, Thai Union] 

[Identifies and provides guidance on best practice in policy development, direct recruitment, working with suppliers, auditing tools, compliance with local law, recruitment fees recimbursement, beyond compliance, and leadership]

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Article
8 August 2017

Companies Take Action to Protect Migrant Workers

Author: Sustainable Accountability International

...A recent report by the Interfaith Center for Corporate Responsibility and Social Accountability International captures best practices that companies have deployed to prevent the violation of these vulnerable workers’ rights. “Many global brands, including HP, Patagonia, and Princes Tuna have taken action to fight the widespread human rights violations against migrant workers. We are pleased to see companies taking a proactive approach to tackle the complex problem,” says SAI’s Director of Corporate Programs Christie Daly...

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