Reporters Without Borders raises concerns over information supplied by Yahoo! to Chinese govt.

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Article
20 September 2005

[DOC] Secretary-General of the International Commission of Jurists, Nicholas Howen, comments on the Yahoo! response

Author: Nicholas Howen, Secretary-General, International Commission of Jurists

It is clear that national laws that violate international human rights standards are not acceptable under international law. I’m deeply concerned that the actions of Yahoo! have led to the imprisonment of a Chinese journalist, Shi Tao, for ten years for doing nothing more than exercising his right to freedom of expression, which is guaranteed by the Universal Declaration of Human Rights.

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Article
16 September 2005

[DOC] Mary Robinson: Remarks on Yahoo!’s response concerning its provision of details to Chinese Government that helped lead to journalist's imprisonment

Author: Mary Robinson (President of Realizing Rights: The Ethical Globalization Initiative; Chair of Business & Human Rights Resource Centre’s International Advisory Network; former United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights; former President of Ireland)

I was shocked and dismayed by Yahoo's response...It appears that Yahoo is unaware of growing public expectations that businesses must assume their appropriate responsibilities for the promotion and protection of international human rights standards wherever they operate. In the time ahead, Yahoo needs to give careful consideration to its role in fostering greater respect for human rights around the world...

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Article
16 September 2005

[DOC] Sir Geoffrey Chandler comment on Yahoo!’s response regarding its provision of details to Chinese Government that helped lead to journalist's imprisonment

Author: Sir Geoffrey Chandler (Founder Chair of Amnesty International UK Business Group 1991-2001, former Director General of UK National Economic Development Office, former Director of Shell International)

I am appalled by Yahoo!’s response...Must we therefore expect Yahoo!, apparently lacking principles itself, to follow any practices, however much they may offend against wider considerations of human rights or international standards?

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Article
14 September 2005

China: Yahoo information used to convict journalist

Author: International PEN, Writers in Prison Committee

The Writers in Prison Committee of International PEN is alarmed by evidence that information supplied by the Internet Service Provider Yahoo! Inc. was used to convict journalist, poet and dissident writer Shi Tao...Please...write to Terry Semel, Chairman of Yahoo!: - expressing alarm that Yahoo! appears to have been complicit in the Chinese government’s prosecution of journalist, poet and dissident writer Shi Tao...- urging Yahoo! to re-examine its policies to ensure that they do not have a negative impacon the legitimate practice of the right to freedom of expression and information, as guaranteed by international human rights standards, notably Article 19 of the Universal Declaration on Human Rights.

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Article
13 September 2005

Comment: Thanks to corporations, instead of democracy we get Baywatch

Author: George Monbiot, Guardian [UK]

The internet at least has helped to promote revolutions of varying degrees of authenticity in Serbia, Ukraine, Georgia, Kyrgyzstan, Lebanon, Argentina and Bolivia. But the flaw in Friedman's [New York Times columnist Thomas Friedman] theory is that he forgets the intermediaries. The technology which runs the internet did not sprout from the ground. It is provided by people with a commercial interest in its development. Their interest will favour freedom in some places and control in others. And they can and do turn it off. [refers to Yahoo!, Microsoft, Google, Cisco Systems, Harper Collins, Morgan Stanley, BP]

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Company response
13 September 2005

Yahoo! response to concerns regarding its role in arrest of Chinese journalist Shi Tao

Author: Yahoo!

Just like any other global company, Yahoo! must ensure that its local country sites must operate within the laws, regulations and customs of the country in which they are based.

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Article
8 September 2005

Yahoo Under Fire Over Jailing of Chinese Journalist

Author: Patrick Goodenough, Cybercast News Service (CNSNews.com)

Internet giant Yahoo, accused this week of providing information that helped land a Chinese journalist in prison for 10 years, says it had no choice. "Just like any other global company, Yahoo must ensure that its local country sites must operate within the laws, regulations and customs of the country in which they are based," Yahoo said in a prepared statement...[also refers to Google, Microsoft]

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Article
7 September 2005

Firms face moral dilemma in China

Author: Jane Wakefield, BBC

Media watchdog Reporters Without Borders has accused Yahoo of being "a police informant for the Chinese regime", following allegations that information supplied by the company helped jail a journalist...Both Microsoft and Yahoo are yet to respond to requests from the BBC News website for comment on the issues they face in China.

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Article
7 September 2005

Yahoo! helps Chinese cops

Author: Rebecca MacKinnon, fellow at Harvard Law School's Berkman Center for Internet and Society, on RConversation weblog

Chinese Journalist Shi Tao was arrested for "divulging state secrets abroad" thanks to Yahoo!'s help...Media reports quote a Yahoo! spokesperson who only says that the company is "looking into it."... [The] Yahoo! Terms of Service...make it clear that Yahoo! does not intend to protect people's communications from their governments... If you are worried about getting in trouble, do not use...any...[online] service whose parent company has a business presence in China. [also refers to Google, Microsoft, Hushmail]

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