Study analyses 5 electricity firms' sustainable electricity provision in global South & impacts on communities, workers & local economy; company responses & non-responses provided

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Company non-response
11 December 2013

AES did not respond to: Study analyses 5 electricity firms' sustainable electricity provision in global South, impacts on communities, workers & local economy.

Company response
11 December 2013

Endesa response

Author: Endesa

Endesa was fully engaged on participating in the study carried out for this report and it welcomes the findings as the report accurately discloses Endesa’s clear and real commitment to sustainability in terms of policies and strategies definition...Nevertheless, due to the fact that the initial works were carried out in 2008 and the final result comes five years later, in 2013, some of the information included in the report is not updated and we believe it does not fully reflect the efforts taken by the company in the recent years to implement actions, both at the global and local levels, in order to bridge the gaps that have been identified across the different materiality and benchmark studies and stakeholder consultations that have been recently carried out...Due to the reasons explained above a full review and update of the information included in the report would be useful and wise and Endesa offers its availability to the researchers to go through this updating. Specifically Endesa would like to correct, clarify and update several points raised in the report...

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Company non-response
11 December 2013

SN Power did not respond to: Study analyses 5 electricity firms' sustainable electricity provision in global South, impacts on communities, workers & local economy.

Article
11 December 2013

[PDF] Quality Kilowatts? A Normative-Empirical Analysis of Corporate Responsibility for Sustainable Electricity Provision in the Global South

Author: Joseph Wilde-Ramsing, University of Twente (Netherlands), Centre for Research on Multinational Corporations (SOMO)

[Business & Human Rights Resource Centre invited AES, Datang, Endesa, Eskom, SN Power to respond. Endesa responses provided. AES and SN Power did not respond. We will indicate here whether Datang and Eskom respond]. There has been an increase in activity around corporate responsibility (CR) in recent years in the electricity industry. However, there is little empirical knowledge regarding how electricity TNCs incorporate international norms for SEP [sustainable electricity provision] into their CR policies and how they make the difficult trade-offs among the various social, environmental, and economic issues associated with SEP...It is crucial to investigate the variation in electricity TNCs’ approach to CR, as well as the associated impact on communities, workers, economies, and the environment in the Global South...Overall, the present study concludes that internationally-agreed normative standards are largely not respected by the electricity companies in their operations in the Global South... two of the primary conclusions of the analysis: 1) Significant differences exist in performance of the five TNC case studies with respect to the SEP benchmarks. 2) Nearly all companies are unable or unwilling to translate their headquarters-level policies into practice on the ground, with some clearly less able or less willing to do so than others. [Case studies on AES, Datang, Endesa (part of Enel), Eskom, SN Power]

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Company non-response
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