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en/un-human-rights-experts-issue-authoritative-guidance-on-obligations-of-states-parties-to-the-intl-covenant-on-economic-social-cultural-rights#c159141

UN Committee reminds govts. of duty to establish remedies beyond natl. borders for adverse corporate human rights impacts

Author: UN Committee on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights, Published on: 26 June 2017

“Business and human rights: States’ duties don’t end at the national borders”, 23 Jun 2017

States should control corporations across national borders to protect communities from the negative impacts of their activities, UN human rights experts have said in an authoritative new guidance on the Obligations of States parties to the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights (CESCR) in the context of business activities…

In practice, the Committee expects home States of transnational corporations to establish appropriate remedies, guaranteeing effective access to justice for victims of business-related human rights abuses when more than one country is involved.

In light of the practices revealed by the Panama Papers and the Bahamas Leaks, the General Comment emphasizes that States should ensure corporate strategies do not undermine their efforts to fully realize the rights set out in the Covenant…

The new General Comment sets out what States can and must do in order to ensure that companies do not violate rights such as the right to food, housing, health or work, which the States themselves are bound to respect...

“It also may be tempting for States to seek refuge behind the initiatives taken by the corporate sector, rather than adopting the appropriate regulatory and policy initiatives that they must adopt. Our General Comment seeks to recall their obligations under the Covenant and define the role they must assume in regulating corporate conduct.”

[Read the full General Comment here]

Read the General Comment here.

Read the full post here