UN Forum 2015: Materials launched

This page contains information about materials launched during the 2015 UN Forum on Business and Human Rights.

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Article
25 November 2015

Updated UN Working Group guidance on Natl. Action Plans

Author: UN Working Group on business & human rights

This guidance of the UN Working Group on Business and Human Rights (UNWG) provides recommendations on the development, implementation and update of National Action Plans (NAPs) on Business and Human Rights.The document is designed to serve as a reference guide for all stakeholders involved in NAP processes. It is based on the recognition that there is no ‘one-size-fits-all’ approach to NAPs.

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Report
17 November 2015

Discussion paper: "Utilizing National Action Plans to Promote Human Rights Due Diligence in Development Finance"

Author: Coalition for Human Rights in Development

Development finance institutions play a determinative role in driving corporate investment and setting the terms of that investment and its corresponding impacts on human rights. For this reason, how governments regulate development finance is a critical issue for the Business and Human Rights agenda. This discussion memo provides preliminary guidance on how to use National Action Plans (NAPs) around Business and Human Rights to promote human rights due diligence in the context of development finance. It describes the connection between the UN Guiding Principles (UNGPs) and development finance and identifies potential policy recommendations. We welcome your reactions and inputs to expand and refine the policy recommendations and examples herein.

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Item
17 November 2015

Factsheet: "10 Reasons Why IFIs and Development Finance Matter for Business and Human Rights"

Author: Coalition for Human Rights in Development & Intl. Corporate Accountability Roundtable

In the past, development finance was largely the purview of the public sector. Today, however, private sector business activities and public development finance are increasingly interconnected and intertwined. Over $100 billion dollars annually is being channeled to business activities in developing and emerging markets by government donors and international financial institutions (IFIs). As IFIs and donors increasingly turn to the private sector to meet development objectives, the implications for the business and human rights agenda are significant. By understanding the unique structure and leverage points of these financial flows, business and human rights advocates can better ensure that human rights are respected and protected, and that corporate abuses are remedied. Unfortunately, too often business and human rights advocacy is disconnected from advocacy around development finance and IFIs. This factsheet aims to bridge this gap by identifying 10 reasons why IFIs and development finance matter for business and human rights.

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Article
17 November 2015

ICANN’s Corporate Responsibility to Respect Human Rights

Author: Institute for Human Rights and Business

...The paper sets out the reasons that the UN Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights (UNGPs) are the most appropriate framework for ICANN to follow in its mission to develop human rights policies and processes, and then presents options as to how ICANN can begin to implement them...Given the current state of ICANN’s discussions on human rights, this paper proposes implementation in stages, applying a human rights-based approach to a specific part of its operation (i.e. the policy development process), and creating a report on its process, rather than tackling the whole issue of HRIAs and CSR concurrently. A human rights review process, and human rights reporting, will contribute to the goal of carrying out HRIAs and a full CSR strategy/reporting. Human rights debates and decisions by ICANN’s board, management, and the global Internet community should take place within the overall policy debate and decision framework, not separately...

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Report
17 November 2015

Report links sustainability reporting standard and the UN Guiding Principles

Author: Global Reporting Initiative

...This GRI linkage document is a practical guide to help companies understand what human rights mean for them in the context of their reporting processes....The current version of GRI Sustainability Reporting Standards, G4, is a leading instrument for measuring and reporting a company’s sustainability impacts and performance on... human rights... Many of the Guiding Principles are reflected in G4... G4’s methodology is directly connected to one of the core expectations of the Guiding Principles: human rights due diligence. At a minimum, the process of creating a G4-based report will familiarize companies with all the key concepts of the Guiding Principles. Ultimately, by reporting with G4, a company can understand and demonstrate that its actions respect human rights and meet the expectations outlined in the Guiding Principles...

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Report
17 November 2015

Toolkit to foster positive engagement between human rights defenders and business

Author: International Service for Human Rights

...This handbook aims to provide human rights defenders (HRDs) with an overview of the existing legal and policy framework and emerging global norms adopted by both governments and businesses to protect human rights in the context of business operations. It also seeks to give defenders tools for strategic engagement with stakeholders, at each stage of project development and in a range of sectors...HRDs should design their engagement strategies in line with their needs and their local knowledge of the business, political and social context. At all times during business engagement, defenders should be sensitive to security risks and make efforts to mitigate danger to themselves, their families, and the organisations and communities with whom they work...

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Report
1 November 2015

Human Rights Defenders & Corporate Accountability

Author: International Service for Human Rights

Human rights defenders who work on issues related to corporate accountability face heightened and specific risks. They are stigmatised, criminalised and attacked, not only by State actors but also by powerful non-State forces including armed groups, private security firms and businesses themselves...In the context of rapid globalisation and business expansion, informed discussion and understanding of the work of human rights defenders to promote corporate respect for human rights and accountability for corporate-related violations is becoming ever more important...This year’s UN Forum on Business and Human Rights provides an important space for this debate, particularly given the inclusion on the agenda of a panel regarding human rights defender protection. ISHR believes that these spaces for discussion, proposals and commitments are crucial. They represent a recognition of the importance of defenders and a concern for the risks they face, whilst pulling together States, businesses, UN agencies, plus the defenders themselves, to discuss solutions.

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