UNICEF releases guidance for companies on engaging stakeholders on children’s rights

UNICEF has released guidance for companies on engaging stakeholders on children’s rights. The objective of the tool is to guide companies on why, with whom and how business should engage stakeholders—both children and child rights advocates—on issues affecting children in order to gain a better understanding of a company’s actual or potential impacts on children’s rights. This tool serves as a companion piece to UNICEF’s suite of tools aimed at supporting companies on the integration of children’s rights into broader human rights activities. 

UNICEF intend companies use this tool to:

  • Determine the relevance and appropriate level of engagement with stakeholders on children’s rights
  • Identify and prioritize child rights stakeholders, including children
  • Conduct direct consultations with children ethically and with appropriate safeguards for children in place

Over a two-year pilot period, UNICEF will work with companies to pilot the guidance and welcomes inputs to further refine the tool. A second and final edition of this tool will be released based on relevant feedback and will include additional case studies of implementation. Kindly send any feedback or case studies, and/or expressions of interest to pilot this guidance in collaboration with UNICEF, to the CSR Unit, Private Fundraising and Partnerships Division: [email protected].

 

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2 December 2014

Children’s Rights in Impact Assessments: Initiative Card

Author: Measuring Business & Human Rights

"Children's Rights in Impact Assessments: A guide for integrating children's rights into impact assessments and taking action for children", Dec 2014

'Children’s Rights in Impact Assessments’ is designed to guide companies in assessing their policies and processes as they relate to their responsibility to respect children’s rights and their commitment to support children’s rights. This tool should be used as part of ongoing assessments of human rights impacts, as outlined in the United Nations Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights. The criteria it offers can be used to review critical areas of potential or actual impact on children’s rights, based on the Children’s Rights and Business Principles. Respecting and supporting children’s rights requires business to both prevent harm and actively safeguard children’s best interests. By integrating children’s rights considerations into ongoing impact assessments, a company is taking an important step towards recognizing children as rights holders and stakeholders, and towards understanding its potential and actual impacts on children. Guidance on specific actions a company can take to address the identified risks to children is provided throughout the tool.

 

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Report
2 December 2014

Engaging Stakeholders on Children's Rights: A tool for companies

Author: UNICEF

"Engaging Stakeholders on Children's Rights: A tool for companies", Dec 2014

This tool offers guidance to companies on engaging stakeholders on children’s rights as part of enhancing their standards and practices at both the corporate and site levels. Engaging stakeholders on children’s rights can inform the development of company policies, and human rights due diligence processes (assessing actual and potential human rights impacts, integrating and acting upon the findings, tracking responses and communicating how impacts are addressed), and the development of grievance and remediation mechanisms. Stakeholder engagement can also feed into a company’s broader sustainability strategy and long-term goals...This tool also serves as a companion piece to UNICEF’s suite of tools aimed at supporting companies in implementation of the Children’s Rights and Business Principles. Its objective is to guide companies on why, with whom and how business should engage stakeholders – both children and child rights advocates – on issues affecting children in order to gain a better understanding of a company’s actual or potential impacts on children’s rights. A company may use this tool in different ways depending on the level of its impact on children’s rights, the size of the business, and the nature and context of the operation.

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