hide message

Welcome to the Resource Centre

We make it our mission to work with advocates in civil society, business and government to address inequalities of power, seek remedy for abuse, and ensure protection of people and planet.

Both companies and impacted communities thank us for the resources and support we provide.

This is only possible because of your support. Please make a donation today.

Thank you,
Phil Bloomer, Executive Director

Donate now hide message

USA: Google, Yahoo, Microsoft, Cisco questioned by Congressional committee over Chinese Internet censorship - chairman accuses firms of "sickening collaboration"

Get RSS feed of these results

All components of this story

Article
15 February 2006

China censorship: Yahoo! defends itself

Author: Rebecca MacKinnon, fellow at Harvard Law School's Berkman Center for Internet and Society, on her weblog, RConversation

Read the full post here

Article
15 February 2006

Chinese censorship: Cisco responds

Author: Rebecca MacKinnon, fellow at Harvard Law School's Berkman Center for Internet and Society, on her weblog, RConversation

[The statement by a Cisco spokesman doesn't] confirm or deny whether they do or don’t provide instruction, training and/or service which helps customers use the routers for censorship purposes, or whether they market their technology to Chinese corporate and government customers with this function as a selling point. He also does not address the fact that Cisco sells surveillance equipment to the Chinese Public Security Bureau, an institution with a well-documented track-record of human rights abuses.

Read the full post here

Article
15 February 2006

Testimony [by Microsoft] to US House of Representatives, Committee on International Relations - Joint Hearing of the Subcommittee on Africa, Global Human Rights & International Operations and the Subcommittee on Asia and the Pacific

Author: Jack Krumholtz, Associate General Counsel and Managing Director, Federal Government Affairs, Microsoft

...[Industry] should advocate policies and principles that maximize the value of the Internet for individual users, including basic protections for freedom of expression... National law and policy set parameters in every country in which we do business, and private companies are required to give them due deference as a condition of engaging in business there. That does not mean that compliance with local law is a matter of deferring reflexively to local authorities or endorsing any specific policy or ideology. Restrictions on content should involve ongoing consultations in which the objective of private operators is to protect the integrity of their services and the privacy of their customers... The example that has received the most attention to our services in China involved the removal of a well-known blogging site on MSN Spaces authored under the pseudonym of “Michael Anti” at the request of the Chinese government. The details of that case have been carefully reviewed, and although we do not think we could have changed the Chinese government’s determination to block this particular site, we regret having to do so and have since clarified the manner in which we will deal with similar requests in the future.

Read the full post here

Article
15 February 2006

Web Firms Are Grilled on Dealings in China [USA]

Author: Tom Zeller Jr., New York Times

Google, Yahoo, Microsoft and Cisco Systems came under fire at a House human rights hearing on Wednesday for what a subcommittee chairman called a "sickening collaboration" with the Chinese government that was "decapitating the voice of the dissidents" there...executives of the four companies were unified in their insistence that their presence in China provided a net benefit.

Read the full post here

Article
15 February 2006

[PDF] Testimony of Google Inc. before the Subcommittee on Asia and the Pacific, and the Subcommittee on Africa, Global Human Rights, and International Operations Committee on International Relations, United States House of Representatives

Author: Elliot Schrage, Vice President, Global Communications and Public Affairs, Google

The requirements of doing business in China include self-censorship – something that runs counter to Google’s most basic values and commitments as a company. Despite that, we made a decision to launch a new product for China – Google.cn – that respects the content restrictions imposed by Chinese laws and regulations...[Our] decision was based on a judgment that Google.cn will make a meaningful – though imperfect – contribution to the overall expansion of access to information in China... [In] a situation where there are only imperfect options, we think we have made a reasonable choice... Google.cn presents to users a clear notification whenever links have been removed from our search results in response to local laws and regulations in China. We view this a step toward greater transparency that no other company has done before.

Read the full post here

Article
15 February 2006

[PDF] Testimony [by Reporters Without Borders] to Committee on International Relations, U.S. House of Representatives

Author: Lucie Morillon, Reporters Without Borders

Authoritarian regimes like China’s are getting increasingly efficient at blocking “objectionable” material, usually with technology bought from Western firms. Some of these companies, most of which are American, don’t respect freedom of expression while operating in a repressive country. [refers to Yahoo!, Microsoft, MSN Spaces (China) (joint venture Microsoft & Shanghai Alliance Entertainment), Google, Secure Computing, Fortinet, Cisco Systems]

Read the full post here