USA: Univ. of Massachusetts research institute releases list of top 100 corporate air polluters - top 10: DuPont, US Steel, ConocoPhillips, GE, Kodak, ExxonMobil, Ford, Tyson, Alcoa, ADM

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Company response
23 May 2006

Response of General Electric to “Toxic 100” ranking

Author: General Electric

GE has a comprehensive EHS (environment, health & safety) management system that operates globally. Since 1987, GE has reduced its emissions by more than 85%, despite greatly expanding its production. We continually evaluate opportunities to further reduce our emissions. The US Environmental Protection Agency has stated that the model used by PERI is properly used for screening purposes only and it is not a quantitative risk assessment model and thus not independently meaningful.

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Article
23 May 2006

[DOC] Political Economy Research Institute note on revised data from Tyson Foods

Author: Political Economy Research Institute (PERI), Univ. of Massachusetts [USA]

A Tyson representative stated that Tyson made overreporting errors in its initial submission to EPA regarding 2002 releases and that Tyson has submitted revised reports to EPA. The expected revision, which has not yet been implemented by EPA, will substantially lower Tyson's Toxic Score and reduce or eliminate Tyson's presence among the Toxic 100... PERI believes that the Toxic 100 publication, which brought Tyson's reporting error to the attention of the company, has thereby contributed to improvement in the quality of data available for environmental decision-making.

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Company response
22 May 2006

Response of DuPont to "Toxic 100" ranking

Author: DuPont

DuPont is committed to adhere to the highest standards for the safe operation of our facilities and the protection of the environment. We will drive toward zero emissions, giving priority to those that may present the greatest potential risk to health or the environment. In an effort to meet this commitment we have reduced our air carcinogen emissions more than 92% since 1987 when they were first reported under the EPA Toxics Release Inventory (TRI). We have reduced all of our TRI-reported emissions and releases more than 80% since 1987... We are concerned about our ranking... We are committed to pursue additional improvements in our environmental performance and we will focus our ongoing efforts on those emissions and releases that present the greatest opportunity for reducing our potential impacts...

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Company response
22 May 2006

Response of Eastman Kodak to “Toxic 100” ranking

Author: David M. Kiser, Director, Health, Safety and Environment & Vice President, Eastman Kodak

Quite simply, the information relative to Kodak is inaccurate and misleading. First, the report used old data from 2002. Since that time, Kodak has reduced air emissions by about one-third. Even more significantly, the analysis performed by PERI was flawed and overestimated the concentration of Kodak emissions by a factor of more than 50 times. The PERI report is based on the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Risk Screening Environmental Indicators (RSEI) model, which is a preliminary screening tool with a number of technical limitations. (The EPA has clearly identified some of these limitations – see http://www.epa.gov/opptintr/rsei/faqs.html .) We recently held discussions with EPA concerning the use of RSEI by PERI, and the agency has acknowledged that the database is not intended to be used in this manner and is working with Kodak and others to prevent such flawed analyses in the future.

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Company response
19 May 2006

Response of United States Steel to “Toxic 100” ranking

Author: United States Steel

Your alleged ranking of toxic air releases is based upon 2002 TRI reports, however you have assigned to United States Steel Corporation emissions from facilities which U. S. Steel did not own or operate in 2002. These are the Granite City Works in Granite City, Illinois; the Great Lakes Works in Ecorse and River Rouge, Michigan; and, the Midwest Plant in Portage, Indiana. According to your listing, these three facilities account for 35% of the score you have assigned to U. S. Steel. If you are going to base your report on 2002 data, you should only look at those facilities which U. S. Steel owned and operated in 2002.

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Article
11 May 2006

Top Corporate Air Polluters Named [USA]

Author: Political Economy Research Institute (PERI), Univ. of Massachusetts [USA]

Researchers at the Political Economy Research Institute (PERI) at the University of Massachusetts today released the Toxic 100, an updated list of the top corporate air polluters... James K. Boyce, director of PERI's environment program [said] "We measure not just how many pounds of pollutants are released, but which are the most toxic and how many people are at risk..." The Toxic 100's top five companies are E.I. Du Pont de Nemours & Co. [DuPont], US Steel, ConocoPhillips, GE, and Eastman Kodak. [rest of top 10: ExxonMobil, Ford, Tyson Foods, Alcoa, Archer Daniels Midland.]

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Article
1 May 2006

US "Toxic 100" list by Political Economy Research Institute (PERI) & company responses

Author: compiled by Business & Human Rights Resource Centre

In May 2006, the Political Economy Research Institute (PERI) at the University of Massachusetts-Amherst (USA) issued an updated version of its "Toxic 100" list of the "top corporate air polluters" in the USA. The Business & Human Rights Resource Centre invited each company in the top 10 to respond to its listing. The companies' responses to their listing, and comments by PERI on those responses, are available below. [Companies that responded: DuPont, US Steel, General Electric, Eastman Kodak, Ford, Tyson Foods (ranking expected to be lowered or eliminated), Alcoa, Archer Daniels Midland. No response from ConocoPhillips, ExxonMobil.]

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