War on Want report on 6 textile factories in Bangladesh supplying Asda, Tesco, Wal-Mart alleges women earning poverty wages, working in unsafe conditions

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Article
8 December 2006

5p an hour women shame UK stores

Author: War on Want [UK]

Workers in Bangladesh are regularly working 80 hours a week for just 5p an hour, in potential death trap factories, to produce cheap clothes for British consumers of Primark, Tesco and Asda’s ‘George’ range...[The] findings in a [War on Want, UK charity] new report, Fashion Victims, [are] based on research among employees at six Bangladeshi factories...which employ over 5,000 workers, mainly women... Primark [part of Associated British Foods], Tesco and Asda [part of Wal-Mart]have all made public commitments to the payment of a living wage to suppliers –...calculated to be a minimum £22 a month in Bangladesh... Louise Richards...War on Want, said: “Bargain retailers...are only able to sell at rock bottom prices in the UK because women workers in Bangladesh are being exploited...”

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Article
8 December 2006

The real price of cheap clothes: Bangladeshi sweatshop labourers paid just 3p an hour

Author: Martin Hickman, Independent

Bangladeshis making cheap clothes for Asda [part of Wal-Mart], Tesco and Primark [part of Associated British Food] are paid as little as 3p an hour, according to a [War on Want, UK charity] report [Fashion Victims]...Basic pay in [garment] factories...could be just £8 a month for an 80-hour week...[W]orkers [also] complained that joining a trade union was banned...22 union members at a factory supplying Asda who demanded overtime pay last year were allegedly beaten, fired and imprisoned on false charges...Asda, Tesco and Primark are members of the Ethical Trade Initiative...Primark [part of said that if War on Want provided details of the factories, it would investigate...Tesco stated that its affordable clothing was not achieved through poor working conditions at suppliers...Asda said only organisations like War on Want and the retailers were trying to help workers and promised to introduce more unannounced audits and free phone lines for whistleblowers.

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Article
8 December 2006

UK firms 'exploiting Bangladesh'

Author: BBC

...The mainly female [textile] workers [in Bangladesh] regularly spend 80 hours per week in "potential death trap" factories [making cheap clothes for UK companies Tesco, Asda and Primark], according to anti-poverty group War On Want. [The companies]...all strongly denied the allegations...It said that...Primark [part of British Foods], Tesco and Asda [part of Wal-Mart] had all signed up to a set of principles to provide decent working conditions and wages for workers in their supply chain...

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Article
8 December 2006

[PDF] full report: "Fashion Victims"

Author: War on Want

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