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Artículo

Another Supreme Court boost for corporate unaccountability?

Global corporations often think they are above the law, but for more than a decade some of the most egregious human rights and environmental violators have had to answer for their overseas actions in U.S. courtrooms. It now appears that the conservatives on the Supreme Court want to put an end to this key tool of corporate accountability. The controversy surrounds a once-obscure 1789 law known as the Alien Tort Statute or the Alien Tort Claims Act (ATCA). It allows foreign citizens to bring civil actions in U.S. courts involving violations of international law or a treaty signed by the United States. The long dormant law was revived in the 1980s by the Center for Constitutional Rights (CCR) as a vehicle for pursuing individual human rights violators and later came to be used against corporations as well. [refers to Chevron, Coca-Cola, ExxonMobil, Rio Tinto, Shell, Unocal (part of Chevron)]

Part of the following stories

Chevron lawsuit (re Nigeria)

Perfil de demanda judicial contra Coca-Cola por actividades en Colombia

ExxonMobil lawsuit (re Aceh)

Rio Tinto lawsuit (re Papua New Guinea)

Perfil de las demandas judiciales contra Shell por actividades en Nigeria

Unocal lawsuit (re Myanmar)