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Artículo

To Avoid Risk of Alien Tort Claims Act Cases, Companies Must Improve Human Rights

The first-ever corporate ATCA verdict of not guilty does not diminish the ongoing liabilities companies face in US courts for human rights violations committed overseas. Late last month, a federal jury delivered the verdict in the first corporate Alien Tort Claims Act (ATCA) case to make it through trial, finding Drummond coal company not complicit in the 2001 murder of three union leaders at one of its mines in Colombia. Drummond’s reprieve may be temporary, however, as the plaintiffs filed appeals protesting the judge’s exclusion or limitation of eye-witness testimony...[also refers to Chevron, Chiquita, Coca-Cola, Exxon-Mobil, Firestone (part of Bridgestone), Shell, Wal-Mart]

Part of the following stories

Perfil de las demandas judiciales contra la empresa Drummond

ExxonMobil lawsuit (re Aceh)

Perfil de las demandas judiciales contra Shell por actividades en Nigeria

Chevron lawsuit (re Nigeria)