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Abu Ghraib Case Involving Private Contractors Draws Top Court's Interest

The U.S. Supreme Court signaled it may consider whether two military contractors can be sued for allegedly abusing inmates at Iraq’s Abu Ghraib prison in a case that could make companies more vulnerable to human rights suits. The justices today asked the Obama administration for advice on an appeal from 26 Abu Ghraib inmates seeking to sue CACI International Inc., which helped interrogate prisoners at the facility, and Titan Corp., which provided translation services. Titan has since been renamed and is now part of L-3 Communications Holdings Inc. The appeal asks the court to decide whether companies and other private parties can be sued under a federal law that authorizes some suits against foreign governments for human rights abuses.

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