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Corporate Immunity Looks Likely: Supreme Court Seems Ready To Side With Shell In Human Rights Suit

The Supreme Court on Tuesday morning appeared divided along party lines, with a conservative majority ready to hold that corporations cannot be held accountable in federal courts for international human rights violations. The Court was hearing oral argument in Kiobel v. Royal Dutch Petroleum, which was brought under a founding-era law, commonly called the Alien Tort Statute…The 12 Nigerian plaintiffs contend that Shell Oil's parent company aided and abetted the Nigerian government in its torture and extrajudicial killing of environmental and human rights protesters resisting Shell's operations in Nigeria in the 1990s.

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US Supreme Court reviews corporate accountability under Alien Tort Claims Act in Kiobel v. Shell - justices seem split along party lines reports Huffington Post

案例简介:壳牌诉讼案(尼日利亚)基奥贝勒(Kiobel)诉壳牌公司案