Carbon Disclosure Project report finds most firms recognise climate change as key risk but have no programme to reduce emissions - US firms lag overall but some rank among best in class: Chevron, Citigroup, Ford, FPL, GE, Marsh & McLennan

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Article
19 September 2006

[PDF] full report: "Carbon Disclosure Project Report 2006 - Global FT500"

In sum, [this report] finds that the global investment and corporate communities have made great strides in their understanding of climate change and its competitive and financial implications, and the measurement of these implications. However, awareness and measurement are not translating into sufficient management and activity in the context of the climate change challenge.
["best-in-class" firms for carbon disclosure: BMW, Ford, Renault, Toyota, DaimlerChrysler, HSBC, UBS, Westpac, ANZ Bank, ABN Amro, Barclays, Citigroup, Fortis, HBOS, ING, Unilever, Cadbury Schweppes, Diageo, Tesco, Bayer, Dow Chemical, Praxair, BASF, DuPont, FPL Group, Entergy, Exelon, American Electric Power, RWE, CLP Holdings, Kansai Electric Power, Iberdrola, Scottish Power, Siemens, General Electric, Allianz, Swiss Re, Marsh & McLennan, Munich Re, BP, Repsol YPF, Suncor Energy, Total, Royal Dutch / Shell, Chevron, Rio Tinto, BHP Billiton, Anglo American, Nippon Steel, Posco.
Companies that did not respond to survey: Monsanto, Edison International, Norilsk Nickel, Sun Hung Kai Properties, Guidant, EOG Resources, Lehman Bros, Fannie Mae, Banca Intesa, SLM (Sallie Mae), Cendant (now Avis Budget), Altria, DirecTV, XTO Energy, First Data, Electronic Arts, Allied Irish Banks, MetLife, Allstate, Gannett, America Movil, Countrywide Financial, Chubb, Telefonos de Mexico (Telmex), Aflac, Westfield Group, Sumitomo Metal Industries, Capital One Financial, Archer Daniels Midland, Wellpoint, Loews, Mediobanca, Paychex.
Also refers to Royal Bank of Canada, Credit Agricole, Nestlé, Kraft (part of Altria), TEPCO (Tokyo Electric Power), AIG, Alcoa, Newmont, Air Liquide, Duke Energy, Coca-Cola, Cemex, CEZ, ConocoPhillips, Dexia, ENEL, ENI, Petrobras, Société Générale, United Technologies, UPS, Honda, Nissan Motor, Peugeot (PSA Peugeot Citroën), Saint-Gobain, CRH, Hitachi, Sharp, Minnesota Mining & Manufacturing (3M), Arcelor (now Arcelor Mittal), Pfizer, AstraZeneca, Fuji Photo Film, Matsushita, Sumitomo Mitsui Financial, Vodafone, Cinergy (now Duke Energy), Intel, Alcan, Goldman Sachs, Morgan Stanley, ExxonMobil, General Motors, Shin Etsu Chemical, Carrefour, Southern Company, Talisman, Suez.]

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Author: Europa Press

Repsol YPF acaba de entrar en el primer índice bursátil de protección climática, el 'Climate Leadership Index'. Además, la compañía ha obtenido la calificación 'Best in Class' lo que confirma a la petrolera como una de las mejores del sector por su estrategia y política de transparencia en este campo...En concreto, Repsol YPF ha sido reconocida por su estrategia, la evaluación de los riesgos derivados del cambio climático en su actividad, así como por la calidad y la efectividad de los planes y programas puestos en marcha para la reducción de los gases de efecto invernadero...En el 'Climate Leadership Index' figuran las 50 mejores compañías de entre las 500 del Índice Financial Times.

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Article
18 September 2006

Most big companies taking few steps about greenhouse emissions

Author: Marianne Lavelle, USA Today

More large corporations than ever before acknowledge they face either commercial risks or opportunities because of climate change, but fewer than half of those companies are taking concrete steps to reduce their own emissions of greenhouse gases, the Carbon Disclosure Project announced this morning... CDP was started by a coalition of activist institutional investors like the California Public Employees' Retirement System [Calpers], but this year...investment houses like Goldman Sachs and Morgan Stanley [joined]... Wal-Mart provided one of the most detailed responses, including that it is responsible for 20.8 million tons of carbon emissions and makes $2 billion in energy purchases each year. "People and the environment are being pushed to the limits," Wal-Mart says in its response. "We view what is happening with our environment as [Hurricane] Katrina in slow motion." The retail giant says its goals are to eventually be supplied by 100 percent renewable energy and to create zero waste, aims that it says "are both ambitious and inspirational" and for which there is as of yet no timetable. [also includes excerpts of responses by Walt Disney, Kellogg; also refers to Boeing, Home Depot, American Express]

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Author: Courrier International [France]

"La plupart des 500 plus grandes entreprises mondiales n'ont aucun programme ni objectif pour réduire les gaz à effet de serre, en dépit des preuves de plus en plus nombreuses que la Terre court à la catastrophe", note le quotidien londonien The Independent. Un organisme international, le Carbon Disclosure Project (CDP), a établi une liste des multinationales en fonction de leur engagement vis-à-vis de l'environnement. Il en ressort que Pepsi, Nintendo et American Express sont parmi les pires au monde. Au Royaume-Uni,...BAE Systems...est l'entreprise la moins engagée en faveur de la planète... "Sur les 360 entreprises qui ont accepté de répondre, 87 % ont reconnu que le changement climatique est un réel problème, ce qui n'empêche pas 57 % d'entre elles de n'avoir aucun programme précis en la matière", précise le quotidien.

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Article
18 September 2006

The $31.5 Trillion Question: Is Your Company Prepared for Climate Change?

Author: Carbon Disclosure Project

$31.5 Trillion Investor Coalition, the Carbon Disclosure Project, Spurs Disclosure of Climate Change Strategies from World’s 500 Largest Companies, Including New Participants Wal-Mart, Home Depot, Boeing, Amex and Disney... The $31.5 trillion in assets behind CDP4 represents an increase of over $10 trillion (50%) from the $21 trillion behind CDP3 in 2005. Much of the increase is the result of US financial giants AIG, Goldman Sachs and Morgan Stanley joining Merrill Lynch, and other US institutional investors, to become CDP signatories... US companies appearing in the CDP4's Climate Leadership Index, which identifies best in class responses, include Chevron, Citigroup, Ford, FPL Group, GE and Marsh and McLennan... Numerous financial institutions, including AIG, Allianz and Goldman Sachs have released dedicated climate change policies in the past 12 months. Moreover, Citigroup, JP Morgan Chase, Merrill Lynch and Morgan Stanley among others have published equity research reports analyzing the financial performance of the carbon markets.

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Article
18 September 2006

World's leading companies lack plan on climate change

Author: Saeed Shah, Independent [UK]

Most of the world's 500 biggest companies have no programme in place, with explicit targets, to reduce their emissions of greenhouse gases... Among the worst performers in the research...were Pepsi..., Nintendo..., and...American Express. Among the 33 British companies, the company doing the least, by far, to address the issue is BAE Systems... CDP is an international coalition of institutional investors, which...includes the likes of Aberdeen Asset Management, Hermes Investment Management and HSBC in the UK...140 companies...did not provide any data, suggesting [a very low] level of concern about the environment. Among these were Honda, Bridgestone, Apple Computers, Goldman Sachs, Kellogg, Philips, Google and Yahoo!... [Besides BAE, the] UK companies scoring below average were Standard Chartered, Scottish & Southern, SABMiller, Royal Bank of Scotland, Prudential [plc], O2 [part of Telefónica], Lloyds TSB and BAT [British American Tobacco].

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