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ITUC campaign accuses Samsung of anti-union activities & "medieval conditions"

We invited Samsung to respond to the allegations put forward by the ITUC.  Samsung sent us a statement outlining their company level approach to labour rights without addressing the specific allegations made by the ITUC.

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Article
1 November 2016

Global reach of Samsung’s medieval practices revealed in new report

Author: Intl. Trade Union Confederation (ITUC)

Samsung workers have shed light on the working conditions throughout the multinational’s supply chains. The International Trade Union Confederation and IndustriALL global union have released a new report, Samsung - Modern Tech Medieval Conditions. “From denying justice to the families of former employees who died from cancers caused by unsafe workplaces, to dodging tax and engaging in price-fixing cartels, one thing is constant: Samsung’s corporate culture is ruthlessly geared towards maximising profit to the detriment of the everyday lives of its workers,” said Sharan Burrow, ITUC General Secretary. The ITUC is petitioning Samsung to end worker abuse and abolish its no-union policy...“For contractors in Samsung’s supply chain whose workers join a union, there is a contract guillotine. The company uses its power and leverage to intervene with its suppliers. From the top of its supply chain down, Samsung prohibits the formation of unions by threatening to cancel contracts wherever workers organise,” said Sharan Burrow.

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Item
1 November 2016

Petition:Samsung: end worker abuse and abolish your "no-union" policy now

Author: Intl. Trade Union Confederation (ITUC)

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Report
1 November 2016

Samsung - Modern Tech, Medieval Conditions

Author: Intl. Trade Union Confederation (ITUC)

Samsung is a huge company accounting for around one fifth of Korea’s gross domestic product. Its supply chains reach around the world with a predominance of workers in Asia. Leaked documents show that Samsung corporate policy is to punish union leaders. Samsung Electronics intervenes actively to prevent the formation of unions at its suppliers. Dominated by Samsung, the cut-throat electronics business outsources work to a network of factories with low-paid workers in unsafe conditions. Samsung’s ‘’no-union’’ policy affects the entire Asian electronics industry. When workers in electronics factories supplying parts to Samsung, Panasonic, Toshiba, Sanyo and Canon have stood together to demand fairer wages and conditions, their leaders have been sacked.

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Company response
1 November 2016

Samsung statement

Author: Samsung

Samsung appreciates Business & Human Rights Resource Centre’s invitation to respond.

Samsung respects the fundamental human rights of every citizen including the rights of its workers pursuant to international human rights principles and standards.  We are committed to abiding by all laws and regulations in the countries and local communities where we conduct our business.  For detailed information, please refer to our 2016 Sustainability Report, in particular the sections on human rights (pp. 64-78) and supply chain management (pp. 82-107), as well as our Business Conduct Guidelines 2016

2016 Sustainability Report : http://www.samsung.com/us/aboutsamsung/sustainability/sustainabilityreports/download/2016/2016-samsung-sustainability-report.pdf

2016 Business Conduct Guidelines : http://www.samsung.com/us/aboutsamsung/sustainability/sustainabilityreports/download/2016/business-conduct-guidelines-eng-2016.pdf