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Nestlé admits slavery in Thailand while fighting child labour lawsuit in Ivory Coast

It’s hard to think of an issue that you would less like your company to be associated with than modern slavery. Yet last November Nestlé…went public with the news it had found forced labour in its supply chains in Thailand…Nick Grono, the chief executive of NGO the Freedom Fund…believes Nestlé’s admission could be a considerable force in shifting the parameters of what can be expected of businesses when it comes to supply chain accountability…Nestlé is…facing legal action in the US. Last week the company…failed in its bid to get the US Supreme Court to throw out a lawsuit seeking to hold them liable for the alleged use of child slaves in cocoa farming in the Ivory Coast. This puts the company in the unfortunate position of disclosing slavery in one part of its operations, while at the same time fighting through the courts to fend off accusations that it exists in another – more profitable – part of its business. [also refers to Patagonia, Archer Daniels Midland, Cargill]