Peru: Govt. and PetroPeru agree to consultation process with indigenous groups negatively affected by oil projects

After protests and a continued action to ensure that their rights under ILO 169 Convention are recognized, indigenous peoples in the Amazon and the govt have established a schedule for a free, prior, and informed consent process with the Peruvian government and the State-owned company PetroPeru and Canadian oil co. Frontera Energy. This agreement commits the goverment to make prior consultation part of the process when the current contract for Block 192 comes up for renewal in September 2019.

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Article
11 November 2018

“Some progress at Block 192; but much still to be done”

Author: Peru Support Group

11 November 2018

An optimistic post issued by Oxfam America and co-authored by Oxfam Peru considers “a small victory” the September agreement signed by the four indigenous federations representing the Amazonian communities affected by oil exploration in Block 192…The agreement commits the government to making prior consultation part of the contracting process when the current contract comes up for renewal in September 2019. This follows an earlier agreement in October last year and now commits the government specifically to a timetable for prior consultation.

Under the formal resolution with Prime Minister César Villanueva, the Ministry of Energy and Mines, and PetroPerú, the government will complete the community consultation for Block 192 between December this year and March next…Abuses and contamination suffered by communities have continued under many different owners...The government plans on it having another 30 years of productive life. 

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Article
2 November 2018

“Righting the many wrongs at Peru’s polluted oil Block 192”

Author: Oxfam America

November 2, 2018

…On September 15, 2018 indigenous federations from the Amazonian Loreto region of northern Peru scored a small victory in the fight for community rights. Representatives from four federations signed an agreement with the Peruvian government and the state-owned enterprise PetroPerú that acknowledges prior consultation as part of the new contracting process for petroleum Block 192. Under the new agreement, Block 192 will undergo a community consultation process before PetroPerú awards a new contract for operating the oil field…“The government has a quick timeframe to consult citizens and find a new strategic partner, but we are optimistic that the Peruvian government will honor its decision to defend prior consultation,” said Frank Boeren, the country director for Oxfam in Peru. “For too long, powerful industry interests have trampled on community rights in the Amazon. This recent decision is a small but needed victory along a tedious and uphill journey for these federations, which Oxfam has proudly accompanied since 2012.”...American-based Occidental Petroleum discovered oil in the region in 1972 and a succession of companies, including the Dutch-Argentinian conglomerate Pluspetrol, left Block 192 (previously Block 1-AB) heavily polluted. While Peru’s Agency for Environmental Assessment and Enforcement fined Pluspetrol for violations, the Peruvian government remains in a protracted legal fight with the oil giant. A majority of the fines are outstanding and Pluspetrol denies any wrongdoing, despite settling with a local community in 2015.

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Article
26 September 2017

“Frontera seeks to invoke force majeure due to Peru protests”

Author: Reuters

September 26, 2017

Frontera Energy Corp (FEC.TO) is seeking to declare force majeure due to protests by Amazonian tribes in Peru that have halted its operations in the country’s biggest oil block, Peru’s energy regulator Perupetro said Tuesday…Perupetro said it was evaluating the Canadian company’s request to allow it to legally suspend contractual obligations due to an event outside of its control, after indigenous protesters seized its oil wells in Block 192 last week over a dispute with the government…Frontera did not immediately respond to requests for comment…Frontera has not produced oil from Block 192 since September 18, when the protests began, according to Perupetro. The oilfield produced some 9,500 barrels per day in August…The pipeline, which transports crude from Amazonian oilfields to the Pacific coast, was shut down in early 2016 after spilling oil in the Amazon and only became fully operational earlier on Tuesday.

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