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Tech companies turn on Daily Stormer and the 'alt-right' after Charlottesville

Author: Julia Carrie Wong, The Guardian , Published on: 14 August 2017

The internet has long been fertile ground for extremists looking to congregate and recruit. But while big internet companies like Facebook, Twitter, and Google have taken seriously the task of combatting Islamist terrorist groups such as Isis and al-Qaida, domestic hate groups have continued to flourish online.  Events in Charlottesville, however, seem to be inspiring at least some companies to reconsider their willingness to host the online activities of white supremacists, neo-Nazis, and other members of the so-called “alt-right”... Video game chat application Discord [has] announced that it was shutting down a server and several accounts “associated with the events in Charlottesville”, including the AltRight server, which was affiliated with prominent white nationalist Richard Spencer and his website. “We unequivocally condemn white supremacy, neonazism, or any other group, term, ideology that is based on these beliefs,” Discord chief marketing officer Eros Resmini said in a statement. “We will continue to be aggressive to ensure that Discord exists for the community we set out to support – gamers.”... Other internet companies took action before Charlottesville to crack down on right-wing hate groups. Airbnb barred people from using its service to book rooms in order to attend the rally. Payment processing platforms such as PayPal and Patreon have banned a number of far right figures from using their platforms to raise money.

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