Thailand: Greenpeace's investigation exposes severe labour rights abuses of rogue overseas fishing fleet in animal food export supply chain

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Author: Greenpeace

« Greenpeace dévoile le visage sombre de l'industrie de la pêche thaïlandaise », 20 décembre 2016

Un nouveau rapport de Greenpeace Asie du Sud-Est (EN) vient mettre en lumière les violations des droits humains perpétrées par des industriels de la pêche thaïlandais. Des travailleurs migrants, notamment cambodgiens et birmans, ont été victimes de travail forcé sur les bateaux de pêche de ces industriels.

...[E]n 2015, l’Union européenne avait adressé un “carton jaune” à la Thaïlande, condamnant les lacunes législatives qui empêchaient de protéger les travailleurs de la pêche contre le travail forcé...Plutôt que d’offrir aux marins des conditions de travail décentes en respectant la réglementation thaïlandaise, les entreprises de pêche ont préféré déplacer leurs flottes dans des zones reculées, là où les contrôles sont moins stricts, voire inexistants.

...[L]es conditions atroces dans lesquelles travaillent les marins peuvent avoir de terribles conséquences, telle qu’une épidémie de béribéri...maladie mortelle provoquée par un manque de vitamine B1...

A cause du transbordement, les bateaux de pêche restent en mer durant des périodes très longues. Les conséquences sont multiples : sanitaires tout d’abord, puisque cela menace très largement la santé des marins, mais également environnementales...

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Item
15 December 2016

Are there human rights abuses in your seafood?

Author: Anchalee Pipattanawattanakul, Greenpeace

Migrant workers from Cambodia and Myanmar are being used as forced labour in the Thai fishing industry. Using tricks of deception, non-binding verbal agreements and induced debt, these workers catch fish both for human consumption and the pet food industry. Now, a new report from Greenpeace Southeast Asia exposes how crackdowns on human rights abuse in the Thai fishing industry has forced vessels to operate further...decreasing their chances of being caught and continuing their illegal practices out of sight, out at sea...

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Article
15 December 2016

Thai fishing industry: abuses continue in unpoliced waters, Greenpeace claims

Author: Kate Hodal, Guardian (UK)

An international crackdown on human rights abuses in the Thai fishing industry has resulted in vessels travelling thousands of miles further into remote and lawless waters, where trafficked men continue to be beaten and sold at sea, a 12-month Greenpeace investigation alleges. According to the report, published on Thursday, seafood caught by such vessels is largely illegal, unreported and unregulated (IUU) and has entered the supply chains of multiple companies producing food for global export, including to the UK, in clear violation of international labour, supply and fishing codes...“One crucial issue which needs to be urgently addressed is the practice of trans-shipment at sea. This allows fishing vessels to remain indefinitely out in the ocean, where monitoring, control and surveillance are limited to non-existent. Greenpeace is urging a moratorium on at-sea trans-shipments for the Thai fleet.”

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Report
15 December 2016

Turn the Tide

Author: Greenpeace

Greenpeace’s 12-month long investigation exposes the activities of Thailand’s rogue overseas fishing fleets, the companies behind them and their supply chain connections to export markets…In the Saya de Malha Bank, the Thai distant water fleet continued to operate in much the same way that had brought it to the attention of authorities over the last few years: taking advantage of under-regulated fisheries; deploying catastrophically unsustainable fishing methods in fragile marine ecosystems; crewing vessels with victims of trafficking and forced labour; offering working conditions that resulted in outbreaks of fatal diseases; and fishing and transshipping catches illegally and without authorisation…Greenpeace investigations uncovered that as of September 2016, following a temporary stoppage in reefer-assisted distant water fishing, seafood from the Saya de Malha Bank continued to flow into the supply chains of major Thai companies producing for global export markets…In response to ongoing concern around these issues, Nestlé Purina PetCare demonstrated strong leadership by pledging to implement a ban on transshipment at sea to help end IUU fishing and human rights abuses against seafaring workers...

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