UN Human Rights Council panel calls on govts. to ensure protection of privacy rights in digital age

Get RSS feed of these results

All components of this story

Article
15 September 2014

Deputy UN High Commissioner for Human Rights warns about potential links between technology, surveillance & human rights abuses

Author: UN Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights

"Human Rights Council holds panel discussion on the right to privacy in the digital age", 12 Sep 2014

Flavia Pansieri, Deputy High Commissioner for Human Rights, in an opening statement said...digital platforms were vulnerable to surveillance, interception and data collection and deep concerns had been expressed as policies and practices that exploited this vulnerability had been exposed around the globe.The panelists were Marko Milanovic, Associate Professor, Nottingham University and Panel Moderator; Catalina Botero Marino, Special Rapporteur on freedom of expression, Inter-American Commission on Human Rights; Sarah Cleveland, Professor, Columbia Law School; Yves Nissim, Deputy Chief CSR officer at Orange, former Chair of the Telecommunications Industry Dialogue; Carly Nyst, Legal Director, Privacy International...In the discussion that followed, speakers noted that the digital revolution brought liberation, but also new challenges.  Alongside the wonderful opportunities for communication, knowledge and business, came new forms of abuse and crime, and alongside the explosion of access to knowledge came new questions about data storage, privacy and access to information.  The importance of ensuring that any State surveillance of citizens was proportionate and fair, respected international law and conventions, and was governed by the rule of law with oversight by civil authorities, was emphasized.  There was a need for the review of procedures, practices and legislation with regard to digital communications in order to ensure that the right to privacy was protected.

Flavia Pansieri, Deputy High Commissioner for Human Rights, in an opening statement said that for millions the digital age had opened the door to emancipation and had been perhaps the greatest liberation movement the world had ever known.  Still, those digital platforms were vulnerable to surveillance, interception and data collection and deep concerns had been expressed as policies and practices that exploited this vulnerability had been exposed around the globe.
 
The panelists were Marko Milanovic, Associate Professor, Nottingham University and Panel Moderator; Catalina Botero Marino, Special Rapporteur on freedom of expression, Inter-American Commission on Human Rights; Sarah Cleveland, Professor, Columbia Law School; Yves Nissim, Deputy Chief CSR officer at Orange, former Chair of the Telecommunications Industry Dialogue; Carly Nyst, Legal Director, Privacy International. - See more at: http://www.ohchr.org/EN/NewsEvents/Pages/DisplayNews.aspx?NewsID=15017&L...
Flavia Pansieri, Deputy High Commissioner for Human Rights, in an opening statement said that for millions the digital age had opened the door to emancipation and had been perhaps the greatest liberation movement the world had ever known.  Still, those digital platforms were vulnerable to surveillance, interception and data collection and deep concerns had been expressed as policies and practices that exploited this vulnerability had been exposed around the globe.
 
The panelists were Marko Milanovic, Associate Professor, Nottingham University and Panel Moderator; Catalina Botero Marino, Special Rapporteur on freedom of expression, Inter-American Commission on Human Rights; Sarah Cleveland, Professor, Columbia Law School; Yves Nissim, Deputy Chief CSR officer at Orange, former Chair of the Telecommunications Industry Dialogue; Carly Nyst, Legal Director, Privacy International. - See more at: http://www.ohchr.org/EN/NewsEvents/Pages/DisplayNews.aspx?NewsID=15017&L...

Read the full post here

Item
15 September 2014

Panel discussion agenda

"27th Session of the Human Rights Council: Panel Discussion on the right to privacy in the digital age", 12 Sep 2014

Based on the request of the Human Rights Council, the panel discussion aims to examine the promotion and protection of the right to privacy in the digital age in the context of domestic and extraterritorial surveillance and/or the interception of digital communications and the collection of personal data, including on a mass scale, also with a view to identifying challenges and best practices, taking into account the report of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights (A/HRC/27/37).

Read the full post here

Article
4 September 2014

Access briefing note on internet rights

Author: Deniz Duru Aydin, Access; Joy Liddicoat & Deborah Brown, Association for Progressive Communications

"APC, Access Briefing note to the Human Rights Council 27th Session", 4 Sep 2014

The 27th session of the Human Rights Council (HRC27) will take place in Geneva from 8-26 September 2014. Internet rights and freedoms will feature prominently with the highlight being the Council’s consideration of the landmark report of the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights on the Right to Privacy in the Digital Age and related panel discussion on September 12th and a discussion on violence against children online. Access partners APC will be attending the session to focus on internet rights and will be supporting a small group of sexual rights activists who will be attending the Council for the first time. They will also be focusing on the reviews of Egypt, Iraq and Democratic Republic of the Congo, which will take place in November, during the 20th Universal Periodic Review (UPR) session. This briefing note highlights the key internet rights-related issues in the Council’s agenda for this session as well as countries under scrutiny in the Universal Periodic Review.

Read the full post here