USA: FCC approves strong rules for "net neutrality"

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27 February 2015

“A real victory for freedom of expression” – UN rights expert hails US move to keep Internet open

Author: David Kaye,UN Special Rapporteur on the promotion and protection of the right to freedom of opinion and expression

The United Nations Special Rapporteur on freedom of opinion and expression, David Kaye, today welcomed the decision of the United States Federal Communications Commission (FCC) to establish new regulations to protect net neutrality in the country.

The FCC’s rules will support a free and open Internet and ensure continued access to any lawful content individuals choose, without restriction or interference from Internet service providers (ISPs). The United States follows a small number of States, such as Brazil, Chile and the Netherlands, that have adopted net neutrality rules.

“This is a real victory for freedom of expression and access to information in the United States,” Mr. Kaye said. “I hope the new rules may serve as a model for other governments seeking to protect or expand an open and secure Internet.”

“It is especially important that the new rules prevent ISPs from discriminating against some types of content in favor of others, either by slowing down delivery speeds or by creating a fast lane to ensure quicker delivery for only some content providers that have paid extra fees,” the expert stressed...

The United Nations Special Rapporteur on freedom of opinion and expression, David Kaye, today welcomed the decision of the United States Federal Communications Commission (FCC) to establish new regulations to protect net neutrality in the country.

The FCC’s rules will support a free and open Internet and ensure continued access to any lawful content individuals choose, without restriction or interference from Internet service providers (ISPs). The United States follows a small number of States, such as Brazil, Chile and the Netherlands, that have adopted net neutrality rules.

“This is a real victory for freedom of expression and access to information in the United States,” Mr. Kaye said. “I hope the new rules may serve as a model for other governments seeking to protect or expand an open and secure Internet.”

“It is especially important that the new rules prevent ISPs from discriminating against some types of content in favor of others, either by slowing down delivery speeds or by creating a fast lane to ensure quicker delivery for only some content providers that have paid extra fees,” the expert stressed.

The new principles classify broadband Internet as a public utility, which will allow the FCC to regulate the Internet in the same way it regulates telephone service and other utilities. This reclassification gives the FCC regulatory control over ISPs and greater authority to enforce net neutrality.

- See more at: http://www.ohchr.org/EN/NewsEvents/Pages/DisplayNews.aspx?NewsID=15622&L...

The United Nations Special Rapporteur on freedom of opinion and expression, David Kaye, today welcomed the decision of the United States Federal Communications Commission (FCC) to establish new regulations to protect net neutrality in the country.

The FCC’s rules will support a free and open Internet and ensure continued access to any lawful content individuals choose, without restriction or interference from Internet service providers (ISPs). The United States follows a small number of States, such as Brazil, Chile and the Netherlands, that have adopted net neutrality rules.

“This is a real victory for freedom of expression and access to information in the United States,” Mr. Kaye said. “I hope the new rules may serve as a model for other governments seeking to protect or expand an open and secure Internet.”

“It is especially important that the new rules prevent ISPs from discriminating against some types of content in favor of others, either by slowing down delivery speeds or by creating a fast lane to ensure quicker delivery for only some content providers that have paid extra fees,” the expert stressed.

The new principles classify broadband Internet as a public utility, which will allow the FCC to regulate the Internet in the same way it regulates telephone service and other utilities. This reclassification gives the FCC regulatory control over ISPs and greater authority to enforce net neutrality.

- See more at: http://www.ohchr.org/EN/NewsEvents/Pages/DisplayNews.aspx?NewsID=15622&L...

The United Nations Special Rapporteur on freedom of opinion and expression, David Kaye, today welcomed the decision of the United States Federal Communications Commission (FCC) to establish new regulations to protect net neutrality in the country.

The FCC’s rules will support a free and open Internet and ensure continued access to any lawful content individuals choose, without restriction or interference from Internet service providers (ISPs). The United States follows a small number of States, such as Brazil, Chile and the Netherlands, that have adopted net neutrality rules.

“This is a real victory for freedom of expression and access to information in the United States,” Mr. Kaye said. “I hope the new rules may serve as a model for other governments seeking to protect or expand an open and secure Internet.”

“It is especially important that the new rules prevent ISPs from discriminating against some types of content in favor of others, either by slowing down delivery speeds or by creating a fast lane to ensure quicker delivery for only some content providers that have paid extra fees,” the expert stressed.

The new principles classify broadband Internet as a public utility, which will allow the FCC to regulate the Internet in the same way it regulates telephone service and other utilities. This reclassification gives the FCC regulatory control over ISPs and greater authority to enforce net neutrality.

- See more at: http://www.ohchr.org/EN/NewsEvents/Pages/DisplayNews.aspx?NewsID=15622&L...

The United Nations Special Rapporteur on freedom of opinion and expression, David Kaye, today welcomed the decision of the United States Federal Communications Commission (FCC) to establish new regulations to protect net neutrality in the country.

The FCC’s rules will support a free and open Internet and ensure continued access to any lawful content individuals choose, without restriction or interference from Internet service providers (ISPs). The United States follows a small number of States, such as Brazil, Chile and the Netherlands, that have adopted net neutrality rules.

“This is a real victory for freedom of expression and access to information in the United States,” Mr. Kaye said. “I hope the new rules may serve as a model for other governments seeking to protect or expand an open and secure Internet.”

“It is especially important that the new rules prevent ISPs from discriminating against some types of content in favor of others, either by slowing down delivery speeds or by creating a fast lane to ensure quicker delivery for only some content providers that have paid extra fees,” the expert stressed.

The new principles classify broadband Internet as a public utility, which will allow the FCC to regulate the Internet in the same way it regulates telephone service and other utilities. This reclassification gives the FCC regulatory control over ISPs and greater authority to enforce net neutrality.

- See more at: http://www.ohchr.org/EN/NewsEvents/Pages/DisplayNews.aspx?NewsID=15622&L...

The United Nations Special Rapporteur on freedom of opinion and expression, David Kaye, today welcomed the decision of the United States Federal Communications Commission (FCC) to establish new regulations to protect net neutrality in the country.

The FCC’s rules will support a free and open Internet and ensure continued access to any lawful content individuals choose, without restriction or interference from Internet service providers (ISPs). The United States follows a small number of States, such as Brazil, Chile and the Netherlands, that have adopted net neutrality rules.

“This is a real victory for freedom of expression and access to information in the United States,” Mr. Kaye said. “I hope the new rules may serve as a model for other governments seeking to protect or expand an open and secure Internet.”

“It is especially important that the new rules prevent ISPs from discriminating against some types of content in favor of others, either by slowing down delivery speeds or by creating a fast lane to ensure quicker delivery for only some content providers that have paid extra fees,” the expert stressed.

The new principles classify broadband Internet as a public utility, which will allow the FCC to regulate the Internet in the same way it regulates telephone service and other utilities. This reclassification gives the FCC regulatory control over ISPs and greater authority to enforce net neutrality.

- See more at: http://www.ohchr.org/EN/NewsEvents/Pages/DisplayNews.aspx?NewsID=15622&L...

The United Nations Special Rapporteur on freedom of opinion and expression, David Kaye, today welcomed the decision of the United States Federal Communications Commission (FCC) to establish new regulations to protect net neutrality in the country.

The FCC’s rules will support a free and open Internet and ensure continued access to any lawful content individuals choose, without restriction or interference from Internet service providers (ISPs). The United States follows a small number of States, such as Brazil, Chile and the Netherlands, that have adopted net neutrality rules.

“This is a real victory for freedom of expression and access to information in the United States,” Mr. Kaye said. “I hope the new rules may serve as a model for other governments seeking to protect or expand an open and secure Internet.”

“It is especially important that the new rules prevent ISPs from discriminating against some types of content in favor of others, either by slowing down delivery speeds or by creating a fast lane to ensure quicker delivery for only some content providers that have paid extra fees,” the expert stressed.

The new principles classify broadband Internet as a public utility, which will allow the FCC to regulate the Internet in the same way it regulates telephone service and other utilities. This reclassification gives the FCC regulatory control over ISPs and greater authority to enforce net neutrality.

- See more at: http://www.ohchr.org/EN/NewsEvents/Pages/DisplayNews.aspx?NewsID=15622&L...

The United Nations Special Rapporteur on freedom of opinion and expression, David Kaye, today welcomed the decision of the United States Federal Communications Commission (FCC) to establish new regulations to protect net neutrality in the country.

The FCC’s rules will support a free and open Internet and ensure continued access to any lawful content individuals choose, without restriction or interference from Internet service providers (ISPs). The United States follows a small number of States, such as Brazil, Chile and the Netherlands, that have adopted net neutrality rules.

“This is a real victory for freedom of expression and access to information in the United States,” Mr. Kaye said. “I hope the new rules may serve as a model for other governments seeking to protect or expand an open and secure Internet.”

“It is especially important that the new rules prevent ISPs from discriminating against some types of content in favor of others, either by slowing down delivery speeds or by creating a fast lane to ensure quicker delivery for only some content providers that have paid extra fees,” the expert stressed.

The new principles classify broadband Internet as a public utility, which will allow the FCC to regulate the Internet in the same way it regulates telephone service and other utilities. This reclassification gives the FCC regulatory control over ISPs and greater authority to enforce net neutrality.

- See more at: http://www.ohchr.org/EN/NewsEvents/Pages/DisplayNews.aspx?NewsID=15622&L...

The United Nations Special Rapporteur on freedom of opinion and expression, David Kaye, today welcomed the decision of the United States Federal Communications Commission (FCC) to establish new regulations to protect net neutrality in the country.

The FCC’s rules will support a free and open Internet and ensure continued access to any lawful content individuals choose, without restriction or interference from Internet service providers (ISPs). The United States follows a small number of States, such as Brazil, Chile and the Netherlands, that have adopted net neutrality rules.

“This is a real victory for freedom of expression and access to information in the United States,” Mr. Kaye said. “I hope the new rules may serve as a model for other governments seeking to protect or expand an open and secure Internet.”

“It is especially important that the new rules prevent ISPs from discriminating against some types of content in favor of others, either by slowing down delivery speeds or by creating a fast lane to ensure quicker delivery for only some content providers that have paid extra fees,” the expert stressed.

The new principles classify broadband Internet as a public utility, which will allow the FCC to regulate the Internet in the same way it regulates telephone service and other utilities. This reclassification gives the FCC regulatory control over ISPs and greater authority to enforce net neutrality.

- See more at: http://www.ohchr.org/EN/NewsEvents/Pages/DisplayNews.aspx?NewsID=15622&L...

The United Nations Special Rapporteur on freedom of opinion and expression, David Kaye, today welcomed the decision of the United States Federal Communications Commission (FCC) to establish new regulations to protect net neutrality in the country.

The FCC’s rules will support a free and open Internet and ensure continued access to any lawful content individuals choose, without restriction or interference from Internet service providers (ISPs). The United States follows a small number of States, such as Brazil, Chile and the Netherlands, that have adopted net neutrality rules.

“This is a real victory for freedom of expression and access to information in the United States,” Mr. Kaye said. “I hope the new rules may serve as a model for other governments seeking to protect or expand an open and secure Internet.”

“It is especially important that the new rules prevent ISPs from discriminating against some types of content in favor of others, either by slowing down delivery speeds or by creating a fast lane to ensure quicker delivery for only some content providers that have paid extra fees,” the expert stressed.

- See more at: http://www.ohchr.org/EN/NewsEvents/Pages/DisplayNews.aspx?NewsID=15622&L...

The United Nations Special Rapporteur on freedom of opinion and expression, David Kaye, today welcomed the decision of the United States Federal Communications Commission (FCC) to establish new regulations to protect net neutrality in the country.

The FCC’s rules will support a free and open Internet and ensure continued access to any lawful content individuals choose, without restriction or interference from Internet service providers (ISPs). The United States follows a small number of States, such as Brazil, Chile and the Netherlands, that have adopted net neutrality rules.

“This is a real victory for freedom of expression and access to information in the United States,” Mr. Kaye said. “I hope the new rules may serve as a model for other governments seeking to protect or expand an open and secure Internet.”

“It is especially important that the new rules prevent ISPs from discriminating against some types of content in favor of others, either by slowing down delivery speeds or by creating a fast lane to ensure quicker delivery for only some content providers that have paid extra fees,” the expert stressed.

- See more at: http://www.ohchr.org/EN/NewsEvents/Pages/DisplayNews.aspx?NewsID=15622&L...

“A real victory for freedom of expression” – UN rights expert hails US move to keep Internet open - See more at: http://www.ohchr.org/EN/NewsEvents/Pages/DisplayNews.aspx?NewsID=15622&L...

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