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New law would create Human Rights Ombudsperson to investigate violations associated with Canadian mining, oil and gas operations overseas

Ottawa, Nov 2, 2016 – The Canadian Network on Corporate Accountability released today detailed model legislation, providing the Canadian government with a blueprint for how to create an effective human rights ombudsperson in the extractive sector.  Human rights abuses at Canadian mining and oil and gas sites around the world are widespread and well documented...A new model law...will help the Canadian government fulfill its promise to remedy human rights abuses and prevent future harm, as well as help create a more predictable and stable operating environment where the responsible business practices of Canadian companies are recognized and rewarded...There are currently two mechanisms in Canada that can receive complaints of local communities relating to overseas operations of Canadian extractive companies...However, these mechanisms lack investigatory powers and independence...Most Canadian political parties...have committed to create an independent human rights ombudsperson for the extractive sector.  Today’s model legislation provides the roadmap to do so swiftly and effectively...“A Canadian company facing credible allegations of overseas human rights abuses should be subject to investigation by an independent and impartial mechanism,” said Emily Dwyer...

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