hide message

Welcome to the Resource Centre

We make it our mission to work with advocates in civil society, business and government to address inequalities of power, seek remedy for abuse, and ensure protection of people and planet.

Both companies and impacted communities thank us for the resources and support we provide.

This is only possible because of your support. Please make a donation today.

Thank you,
Phil Bloomer, Executive Director

Donate now hide message

India: 30th anniversary of Bhopal gas tragedy - victims still await justice

A_Panel_displays_pictures_of_residents_died_in_bhopal_gas_tragedy_photo_credit_Reuters

It's been 30 years since Bhopal gas tragedy occurred on the night of 2 December 1984 at the Union Carbide India Limited (UCIL) where cyanide gas accidently leaked into the air, killing thousands of residents in the capital city of Madhya Pradesh. Estimates vary on death toll and more than one lakh people are still suffering the aftermath of the mishap and children are still born with congenital diseases. The water is said to be contaminated affecting the health of people, tonnes of waste remain in the underground, where thousand were buried following the tragedy. Activists have been fighting to hold Union Carbide accountable, and to claim justice for the victims of the world’s worst industrial disaster. “While Union Carbide continues to have the utmost respect and sympathy for the victims, we find that many of the issues being discussed today have already been resolved and responsibilities assigned for those that remain," said Tomm F Sprick, Director of Union Carbide Information Center.

Get RSS feed of these results

All components of this story

Article
10 May 2017

Bhopal gas tragedy: Amnesty International lobbies US on human rights issues in India

Author: Press Trust of India

...NGO Amnesty International is lobbying with the US lawmakers to advocate for "protection of human rights defenders" in India among other countries, as also to seek "political pressure" on the American companies responsible for the Bhopal gas tragedy...It also wants the top leaders of the US and India to demonstrate "the importance of making the respect and protection of human rights an integral part of a just society". In its latest quarterly lobbying disclosure report filed with the US Senate last week, Amnesty International has listed "protection of human rights defenders" in India and several other countries among the "specific lobbying issues" for the quarter ended 31 March...Asked about the points of advocacy regarding this, Amnesty International India's Executive Director Aakar Patel said...We have worked with Indian authorities and US authorities to try to ensure that Dow Chemicals responds to the many official summons of the Bhopal court hearing this issue

 

Read the full post here

Article
28 March 2017

Bhopal gas tragedy site has 336 tonnes of hazardous waste, says govt

Author: Hindustan Times

Around 336 tonnes of hazardous waste is lying in the premises of Union Carbide India Limited, the site of the infamous 1984 Bhopal gas tragedy, the government said...Environment minister Anil Madhav Dave, in a written reply in the Lok Sabha, said the government has neither sought any allocation of funds from department of expenditure nor any allocation has been made for disposal of toxic waste...He said the central government has taken all measures for safe and speedy disposal of the toxic waste which include assessment of the waste, evaluation of toxicity, safe packaging and storing of waste at the site, identification of appropriate technology for disposal, trial disposal of 10 tonnes of waste and formulation of procurement framework.

Read the full post here

Article
2 December 2015

Timeline

Author: International Campaign for Justice in Bhopal

December 2-3, 1984: Poisonous gas leak from Union Carbide’s pesticides factory occurs at midnight December 3rd, 1984.

December 3, 1984: First Information Report (FIR) on the disaster filed at Hanumangunj police station, Bhopal.

December 7, 1984: Former Union Carbide Corporation (UCC) CEO, Warren Anderson and nine other executives are charged in the Indian courts. While visiting the Bhopal factory, Anderson is arrested. Shortly afterwards he is released on a bail of 25,000 Rupees (approximately $500 at the time) after promising that he would appear in the Indian courts to face the charges against him. 

Read the full post here

Article
25 May 2015

India: Modi govt completes 1 year, bhopal gas victims have nothing to cheer, says activists

Author: Guneet Narula, International Campaign for Justice in Bhopal

At a press conference...survivors of the December ‘84 Union Carbide gas disaster, condemned the NDA government for its failure to secure justice and provide rehabilitation during its one year rule. The conference was organized jointly by five Bhopal based organizations fighting for the rights of the survivors on the occasion of the completion of one year of the NDA government.

Read the full post here

Article
23 February 2015

India: UNEP offers to carry out comprehensive assessment of the contamination of Union Carbide hazardous waste in Bhopal

Author: Hindustan Times

The United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) has indicated possibility of undertaking a comprehensive scientific assessment of contamination due to the toxic waste left in the abandoned Union Carbide factory in Bhopal, gas survivors’ organisations have said...In December 1984, methyl iso-cyanate gas leaked from the Union Carbide factory, killing hundreds and maiming thousands for life...However, the UNEP would require formal request from the ministry of environment and forest (MoEF) in order to consider the possibility. In this context, representatives of five gas survivors’ organisations met the MoEF minister Prakash Javdekar during his recent visit to Bhopal...the minister has promised a response in the matter within 15 days.

 

Read the full post here

Article
23 January 2015

Amnesty International wants Obama to talk about Bhopal gas tragedy

Author: Press Trust of India

Ahead of his visit to India, a human rights group has asked the US President, Barack Obama, to speak about the Bhopal gas tragedy while promoting his country’s business interests during the trip. Even after 30 years, people continue to suffer from the impact of the disaster at a factory owned by US-based company Union Carbide Corporation (UCC), that killed 20,000 and injured thousand others. The site is not cleaned up, the Amnesty International had said yesterday. “The failure of Obama to speak will embolden US-based companies to ignore accountability for their involvement in human rights abuses...While promoting US business interest in India, Obama should not ignore the welfare of Indian citizens,” it added.

Read the full post here

Article
23 January 2015

Why Prime Minister must raise issue of Dow’s liability for Bhopal disaster with the US President

Author: Gopal Krishna, ToxicsWatch Alliance

Now that Barack Obama, President of USA will be in New Delhi as chief guest on the Republic Day, Prime Minister Narendra Modi must raise the issue of accountability of Dow Chemicals Company...He must raise the issue of fugitive corporations Union Carbide Corporation (UCC) and UCC Kowloon’s successor which are absconding from Indian law. They are Dow’s subsidiary corporations. Obama’s intervention can ensure that they are made appear in the Indian court. The US District Court had subjected them to Indian jurisdiction...Obama must be told about the double standards adopted by Dow which has set aside $2.2 billion to address future asbestos-related liabilities arising out of the UCC’s acquisition. Dow which purchased UCC and its Indian investments is denying inheriting any liability for the Bhopal disaster.

Read the full post here

Article
1 December 2014

Bhopal gas victims write to India's Prime Minister demanding justice & accountability

Author: Rashida Bi, Bhopal Gas Peedit Mahila Stationery Karmchari Sangh, Nawab Khan, Bhopal Gas Peedit Mahila Purush Sangharsh Morcha, Balkrishna Namdeo, Bhopal Gas Peedit Nirashrit Pensionbhogi Sangharsh Morcha, Satinath Sarangi, Rachna Dhingra, Bhopal Group for Information and Action & Safreen Khan, Children Against Dow Carbide

We…urge you to consider the following demands of five survivors’ organizations to stop the ongoing disasters in Bhopal….demands 2 to 7 from the Central Government are on the civil, criminal and environmental liabilities of the American Multinationals, Union Carbide Corporation and Dow Chemical…Demands 8 to 10 related to the medical care and economic and social rehabilitation of the survivors, deserve your special attention and consideration…We write this letter with the hope that your government will make Union Carbide and Dow Chemical obey the directions of Indian courts…with the hope that you and your government are aware that Bhopal was the original “make in India” in the profoundest sense of the phrase.

Read the full post here

Download the full document here

Article
1 December 2014

From gas tragedy survivor to activist

Author: Nikita Mehta, Mint

Abdul Jabbar began fighting for the rights of people around him decades ago…on the night of 2-3 December 1984. Jabbar, a construction worker who used to dig borewells, was sleeping in his home when lethal methyl isocyanate (MIC) gas descended on the city of Bhopal after leaking from the Union Carbide India Ltd factory….That night, he helped many people get treatment at the state hospital, and got bodies taken for post-mortem…In 1987, he set up the Bhopal Gas Peedit Mahila Udyog Sangathan (Bhopal Gas Female Victims’ Association), an advocacy and recognition group for victims and survivors, and took out protest marches demanding sustenance allowance and compensation, especially for widows of gas victims. 

Read the full post here

Article
1 December 2014

Industrial disasters: Is India better prepared than it was in 1984

Author: Apoorva & Sreeja Sen, Mint

In 1984, the Bhopal gas tragedy shook the nation...What followed, however, was the realization that if industrial development was unregulated and reckless—without adequate safeguards—the consequences could be far-reaching. Alongside, the demand grew for accountability of industries that engage in potentially hazardous activities. Thirty years on, it is pertinent to ask: Is India any better prepared today to deal with a similar tragedy? The question acquires greater urgency amid a robust move by the government to promote manufacturing by foreign companies in India...Clearly, India can boast of more than enough laws to tackle a chemical disaster. However, the effectiveness of these laws needs to be assessed...With the experience of Bhopal serving as a sobering of the poor implementation of the nation’s abundant legislation, experts are wary about India’s planned move to embrace nuclear energy

Read the full post here